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Staff Picks: Books

My Sister the Serial Killer

According to the dust jacket on My Sister the Serial Killer, Korede's sister has "a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends." The term "inconvenient" indicates that author Oyinkan Braithwaite will treat this grim situation with unexpected complexity.

Despite the fact that her sister, Ayoola, is also flighty, selfish, and manipulative, practical and dependable Korede comes to her aid whenever necessary. Short powerful chapters gradually and suspensefully reveal what is behind the sisters' unusual relationship. At times My Sister the Serial Killer is simultaneously humorous and chilling, especially at the moment the sisters' lives intersect at the hospital where Korede works.


The History Book : Big Ideas Simply Explained

I happen to like books from DK Publishing, a firm that produces quality items on quality paper. They specialize in books that have a pictorial, visual emphasis. From the library's teen section is this one-volume digest of world history arranged in two-page chapters. This is a good book even for those who have studied history extensively, since herein, under one cover, are photos and information not often seen elsewhere. It's unlikely that anyone would read this book straight through although one could; it lends itself to selective browsing in chapters of interest to the reader.


Miles Morales: Spiderman

Confession: I have Peter Parker fatigue. He’s had seven movies in the past two decades, more if you count the Avengers, and the story’s always the same: spider bite, ditch the glasses, fight a goblin. To be honest, I’m over it.

So last year, when I saw MilesMorales: Spiderman hit the shelves, and written by all-star YA novelist Jason Reynolds no less, I was intrigued. The familiar hero was getting a much need update.  But after watching the dazzling movie that introduces the new Black and Puerto-Rican web slinger to the big screen, I knew that I needed to read this novel immediately.

 I was delighted to find out more about Morales’ world—the strained and complicated relationship between his dad and his uncle, and to see what a solid friendship he has with his roommate Ganke. But then as the story continues to unfold it becomes clear that this Spiderman isn’t just duking it out with a giant lizard man or whatever. That’s too easy. The first Black Spiderman in the MCU takes on one of the most powerful enemies facing the Black community today: institutional racism. This novel pulls no punches and examines important issues while sacrificing none of the excitement and action-packed antics that we’ve come to expect out of our Spiderman stories.

Your twelve year old might say they hate reading, but have they read about Miles Morales? 


Built : The Hidden Stories Behind Our Structures

Roma Agrawal, at only 35 years of age, is an experienced structural engineer who has been involved in building some very large projects, such as London's 'The Shard,' western Europe's tallest tower. She is also a promoter of technical and engineering careers to young people, particularly women. In this book, she describes in easy-to-understand terms many aspects of the work that has gone into some of the world's buildings and structures, both ancient and modern. Among these are the pyramids, the Northumbria University Footbridge, the John Hancock Center in Chicago, Metropolitan Cathedral in Mexico City, and Brooklyn Bridge. As Henry Petroski of Duke University says, this is 'a book about real engineering written by a real engineer who can really write.'


Year-End Review

As 2018 winds down, its a customary tradition for staff to compile a list of those books, movies and albums that have inspired us, made us laugh, made us cry, stoked our imagination, and provoked us to think deeply about the relationship between fact and fiction, reality and fantasy and art and life. Here are a few of my favorites.

 

Winter, Karl Ove Knausgaard
Becoming, Michelle Obama
WKW: the Cinema of Wong Kar Wai, John Powers
Time Pieces: A Dublin Memoir, John Banville
Meaty, Samantha Irby
My Year of Rest and Relaxation, Ottessa Moshfegh
These Truths: A History of the United States, Jill Lepore
The Largesse of the Sea Maidens, Denis Johnson

 


End of Year Scramble

It never fails.

Every year at this time, I find myself scrambling to read, before the end of the year, at least one or two more books; titles that are appearing and re-appearing on many “best of [insert year]” lists. Of course, it’s a self-imposed deadline; I can certainly read these books whenever I please. But in just a matter of weeks, we’ll be on our way to starting a new “best of” list, so I use this opportunity to add a couple more contenders to my personal “best books of the year” list.

That Kind of Mother follows the life of Rebecca Stone—white, poet, dreamer, wife, and mother—through her first twelve or so years of motherhood. A sequence of events involving the woman of color Rebecca hired to be her older child’s nanny at a time when, as a new mother, Rebecca was unsure and afraid, leads her and her husband to adopt a black son too. The result: an in-depth examination of what it means to be a mother and to be a family, and of how Rebecca makes sense of that experience at different times in her life. 

If you like character-driven plots, with complicated, strained, and tender relationships all rolled into one story, I urge you to pick this one up. And yes, I consider it one of my favorites of the year.


ONE HUNGRY BUNNY WITH EARS SO FUNNY

Hungry Bunny is a fun, interactive preschool picture book about, ( yes, you guessed it), a hungry bunny. This bunny's tummy rumbles and grumbles, so he sets off to pick some juicy apples that just might be the perfect snack to appease his appetite.

The young reader can help bunny perform his apple gathering task by shaking the tree so that the apples fall down, blow away the leaves, etc. This book also has a handy "red scarf", ( really a bookmark ribbon), to help our little buck-toothed protagonist climb the tree and even make a makeshift bridge. In the end, bunny and his family enjoy some freshly baked apple pie and share it with the reader! Imagine that!

By New York Times bestselling author and illustrator Claudia Rueda. This is an all-around wonderful book to please the fancy of the younger set!


The Season of Styx Malone

I really enjoyed the new book by Kekla Magoon. It reminded me a little bit of Orbiting Jupiter but more lighthearted. When ten-year-old Caleb and older brother Bobby Gene meet sixteen-year-old Styx Malone, they are in for a not-so-boring summer. Caleb and Bobby Gene have really different personalities even though they are very close. Of course, that's typical of siblings, but the way their relationship is portrayed is really well done. And while I started out thinking that their dad was going to be nothing but a jerk, his character changes over time. Styx's character also grows over the course of the book. I kept turning pages because I wanted to see if what I thought was going to happen would happen. Well, I can tell you that it did and it didn't. No plot spoiler there at all, right? 

Great storytelling, great turns of phrase, and a diverse and interesting cast of major and minor characters makes this a really good read. The Season of Styx Malone asks: What are the limits of friendship? When does being protective become overprotective? The small-town summer-time setting reminded me of summers from my own childhood. This is a great book to enjoy as a family over the Thanksgiving break.


My Beijing by Nie Jun

My Beijing: Four Stories of Everday Wonder by Nie Jun is a children's graphic novel that collects four brief but fantastic stories. The tales bring Yu'er and her grandpa's neighborhood to life, all with interesting characters and a twist of magical realism. Nie Jun's art is whimsical and bright. I read this graphic novel quickly, but it stayed with me, so I'll be keeping my eyes peeled for more from this author. Although you'll find it shelved with children's books, My Beijing is for all ages of comic fans.


A Very Large Expanse of Sea

With stunningly beautiful prose and a protagonist who will make you laugh and cry, A Very Large Expanse of Sea, by Tahereh Mafi, has just risen to the very top of my "Best of 2018" list. The book follows a year in the high school life of 16 year old Muslim girl, Shirin. The year is 2002 and unfortuneately, Shirin is no longer surprised by how awful other humans can be. To protect herself she projects indifference as she moves from school to home and back again. Of course, as in so many teen stories, something interrupts her planned indifference. The readers' heart will break and mend and break again along with Shirin's in this incredibly moving, sometimes devastating, and ultimately hopeful, snapshot of her life. Check it out today! You'll be so glad you did!                                            

This is the first book I've read by Tahereh Mafi. She's also the author of the Shatter Me teen series and the middle grade fantasy novels, Furthermore and Whichwood. I'll be reading every word she writes!