RSS Feed

Staff Picks: Books

Last Call: Prohibition in Kalamazoo a Century Ago

On May 1st, 1915 — exactly 100 years ago today, Kalamazoo “went dry,” closing the doors on all of the saloons, bars, clubs and other public drinking establishments throughout the county. During the April 5th election that year, Kalamazoo voters had turned out in strong support of the “local option,” which would make it illegal to sell or manufacture distilled liquor, beer and wine after May 1st.

With little in the way of last-minute fanfare and without a single reported incident of public drunkenness, 65 local establishments cleared their shelves, drained their kegs, and closed their doors in order to meet the midnight, April 30 deadline. This included 39 saloons in the city of Kalamazoo, along with a handful of others in Schoolcraft and Vicksburg, plus the Kalamazoo Brewing Company, the last in Kalamazoo’s long line of pre-Prohibition brewers and distillers.

But Kalamazoo wasn’t the first county in the state to ban liquor sales. Anti-liquor sentiment had been “brewing” in Michigan since before the Civil War. Van Buren County led the way when it went dry in 1907, and by 1911, 39 counties had adopted local ordinances against alcohol. Michigan became the first state in the nation to go “dry” with a statewide ban on liquor sales in 1918, more than a year ahead of the nationwide federal ban on alcohol sales and consumption, the Eighteenth Amendment.

Kalamazoo Telegraph-Press, April 6, 1915

This all came to an end in December 1933 with the passage of the Twenty-first Amendment and the repeal of Prohibition, but the effects of the prohibition movement lingered for decades. Kalamazoo restaurants were prohibited from selling liquor by the glass until 1964, and the sale of liquor before noon on Sunday was still against the law until 2011.

Now, of course, Kalamazoo has a thriving batch of craft brewers and distillers, and has since earned a solid reputation among beer lovers nationwide. So celebrate... check out The Michigan Beer Film, take a tour of Kalamazoo's beer culture with West Michigan Beer Tours, or earn your degree in sustainable craft brewing from the new KVCC-WMU joint venture. How things have changed. Cheers!


A story of a brilliant young man that went to Yale but couldn’t leave the Hood behind.

 

 This is a sad and much too familiar story. The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace is about a young who was gifted with a brilliant mind. His mom did what she was could to get him in the right places. He made it into Yale. He got all A’s, but it wasn’t enough. He could not separate himself from the Hood. The Dorm life, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry could not compete with the call of the lifestyle he was raised in. Robert Peace’s life ended tragically. He wanted to live both worlds. He was gunned down while trying to make fast money.  

Jeff Hobbs did an excellent job on telling the Robert Peace story.

 


Beyond Clear

If you’ve seen HBO’s recent, much-ballyhooed, critically-acclaimed documentary Going Clear, an exposé of Scientology’s nefarious side, be sure to check out the Lawrence Wright book upon which it was based, the full title of which is Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief. The film consists of two straight hours of jaw-dropping revelations about behind-the-scenes misdeeds and corruption—all disclosed by not just former members of Scientology, but former members who were very highly ranked in the organization (right-hand men, enforcers, etc.). Despite being chock-a-block with trespasses, there is so much more that Wright uncovered in his book that filmmaker Alex Gibney could not fit into his movie, including stories of missing persons, suspicious deaths, and other major conspiracies and scandals. The film is not yet available on DVD (though anyone with HBO or HBO Now can watch it on demand), so if you haven’t seen it yet, you can start with the book, and if you have, the book will provide a vast amount of supplemental information for the fullest, “clearest” experience of this subject.


A Smart Girl’s Guide to Knowing What to Say

A Smart Girls Guide to Knowing What to Say by Patti Kelley Criswell offers VERY good suggestions for making small talk, introducing yourself, and dealing with a host of difficult situations. This is a great book, geared toward upper-elementary kids and teens, but actually good for all ages – even adults.

The book covers how to talk to adults, how to ask for something you want, friendship troubles, saying no, apologizing, dealing with bullies, clever comebacks, etc. etc. etc. It shows most of the conversations in speech bubbles, a great format for today’s kids. It is so good, I am going to buy it so I’ll have it as a reference for my kids and me. I recommend it for boys, too, even though it says smart GIRL’S… the situations and advice in the book applies to both girls and boys.


How We Got to Now

This 2014 book by Steven Johnson is subtitled Six Innovations That Made the Modern World. Those six are each described in chapters which are entitled glass, cold, sound, clean, time, and light. Various inventions are recalled under each heading. For example, the chapter on cold discusses the development of refrigeration and the chapter on clean covers advances in public health. The illustrations and photographs by themselves make this book worthy of examination. One of my favorites is the reproduction of the old Clorox ad on page 153. Available in four formats: e-book, digital audiobook, compact disc, and print.


I'm afraid you shouldn't read this Dave

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies, Oxford University Philosophy Professor Nick Bostrom’s exploration of the complexity of potential consequences of introducing a machine with superhuman intelligence into our world. The book first defines and explores possible paths to an “artificial intelligence” that surpasses human capability, and then goes on to speculate on the, mostly catastrophic, consequences of doing so, and finally discusses ways that humanity could better orchestrate the inevitable development of a super intelligent technology that would not necessarily result in our total subservience to our new machine overlords or lead to a quick and utterly efficient snuffing out of humanity in toto. All of this, while sounding like a complete fantasy, is handled by Bostrom with a seriousness and rigor that forces it out of the realm of sci-fi and into a realization that this is exactly where technology is headed and we better hope that those who are pushing us toward better and better AI are taking heed. The stakes could not possibly be higher.


101 Two-Letter Words

For someone who loves books and reading, and is inflicted with an incurable case of curiosity, working in a library is often both a blessing and a curse. I read hundreds of book reviews every year, I see tons of books every day, and I talk about books with patrons, coworkers, and friends incessantly. On top of those sources, my love of bookstores and the existence of the internet means there are untold book discoveries to be made. All those books lead me to seek out even more books, and there's really no hope I'll ever get to all the titles that catch my eye. Earlier this week, while working in the 400 Dewey range of adult non-fiction (the section for language) I stumbled upon a newer book called 101 Two-Letter Words by musician Stephin Merritt, front man of pop band the Magnetic Fields. It's a little book of short poems, one for each of the two-letter words allowed in Scrabble. I recently started playing Scrabble again, so this book was a happy discovery. Merritt's poems make memorizing the two-letter words easier and more enjoyable. Here are a few poems:

AI
The ai, a threatened three-toed sloth
Found only in Brazil,
munches on leaves and sleeps in trees.
I hope it always will.

QI
Qi, in Chinese medicine:
vitality, or breath;
say it "chee," as in "Say cheese!"
Its opposite is death.

SH
"Sh," says the librarian,
"people are trying to read.
And turn that goddamn cellphone off,
before I make you bleed."

The book is illustrated by Roz Chast, whose graphic memoir Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, appeared on numerous best of 2014 lists and was a National Book Award finalist. 101 Two-Letter Words persuaded me to finally pick up her book and reminded me that the library's digital magazine service, Zinio, now offers access to the New Yorker, which Chast works for as a cartoonist. My to-read pile continues to grow!


Citizen: An American Lyric

Citizen: An American Lyric is a powerful meditation on race from author Claudia Rankine. It adorned many ‘best of’ lists in 2014 and was nominated for several literary awards. The slender book is an intense yet lyrical portrait of American racism in 2015 that explores both the veiled and unambiguous manifestations of this most insidious fact of life. Rankine possesses a spirited voice and expresses audacious candor in linking everyday racism with its corrosive impact upon the marginalized and powerless. Rankine’s book, characterized by a hybrid form that mixes prose, essay, memoir, and the occasional image investigates the relationship between race, invisibility and the notion of citizenship. April is National Poetry Month and for those who have not read this powerful, timely book, place it on your future reading list.


The Collapse

I was in grade school when the Berlin Wall went up in 1961 and very clearly remember the crisis that this act by the Soviet Union and the regime in East Germany engendered. It was the subject of many class discussions over the next several years, and of course, it was all over the news. I also remember how elated the world was when the Wall came down in 1989 and the people of East Berlin could be free again. Author Mary Elise Sarotte, visiting professor of government and history at Harvard University, indicates in this 2014 book that the breach of the Wall was neither planned nor the result of negotiations, but was an accident. This is a dramatic account of the events that changed Berlin, Germany, Europe, and the world.


Good for Amy Poehler!

I recently started listening to the audiobook of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please and I love it. Amy Poehler is a modern feminist heroine to me; she’s funny, passionate, and confident, not to mention extremely successful and hard-working. Her book offers a glimpse into her life--relationships, career, and motherhood—and exudes all the happy humor you’d expect from the SNL alumni and Parks and Recreation star. Her motto, “Good for her! Not for me,” has really stuck with me; it’s a great way of admiring and encouraging other women while still being kind and confident with one’s self.
If you’re a fan of Amy Poehler’s television shows or movies, or enjoyed Tina Fey’s Bossypants, give Yes Please a try. I highly recommend listening to it, as born-performer Amy Poehler reads it herself, along with guest stars such as Kathleen Turner, Patrick Stewart, and Carol Burnett.