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Staff Picks: Books

The Girl Who Drank the Moon

The Girl Who Drank the Moon, by Kelly Barnhill, is the 2017 Newbery Medal winner! The Newbery Medal is awarded by the American Library Association to "the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children."  The Girl Who Drank the Moon reminded me of an older book, Marge Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time. Both books take place in two worlds. In Piercy's book, the main character travels in time to bridge two worlds, one dystopian and one utopian. One really interesting thing about The Girl Who Drank the Moon is how its two worlds exist side-by-side but are kept separate by the mythology that the people have been taught. Barnhill gradually connects these worlds together.

Though the two worlds in The Girl Who Drank the Moon, one dystopian and the other human centered and nurturing, seem very different from this world, there are some parallels. Elements of both of these worlds exist in our own multi-faceted world. Is our own world made of multiple worlds kept separate by beliefs, mythologies, and traditions? I think we can safely say that it is. 

There is quite a lot to think about in The Girl Who Drank the Moon. It's also a great story. The library has print copies of the book with more on the way, but everyone should know that the 2017 Newbery Medal winner is available in an ebook format via Hoopla. That means you can start reading with just a few clicks.



The Girl Who Drank the Moon

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The Girl Who Drank the Moon, by Kelly Barnhill, is the 2017 Newbery Medal winner! The Newbery Medal is awarded by the American Library Association to "the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children."  The Girl Who Drank the Moon reminded me of an older book, Marge Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time. Both books take place in two worlds. In Piercy's book, the main character travels in time to bridge two worlds, one dystopian and one utopian. One really interesting thing about The Girl Who Drank the Moon is how its two worlds exist side-by-side but are kept separate by the mythology that the people have been taught. Barnhill gradually connects these worlds together.

Though the two worlds in The Girl Who Drank the Moon, one dystopian and the other human centered and nurturing, seem very different from this world, there are some parallels. Elements of both of these worlds exist in our own multi-faceted world. Is our own world made of multiple worlds kept separate by beliefs, mythologies, and traditions? I think we can safely say that it is. 

There is quite a lot to think about in The Girl Who Drank the Moon. It's also a great story. The library has print copies of the book with more on the way, but everyone should know that the 2017 Newbery Medal winner is available in an ebook format via Hoopla. That means you can start reading with just a few clicks.

Posted by Bill Caskey at 01/28/2017 10:53:05 AM