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Staff Picks: Books

WASPs of WWII

During World War II, two disadvantaged groups got to serve their country as aviators. One group was the Tuskegee Airmen, composed of African American males. The other group was the WASPs: Women Airforce Service Pilots. Unfortunately, neither group welcomed black females. If you want to be inspired by black female aviators, read up on Bessie Coleman, Janet Harmon Bragg, and the contemporary superstar Vernice Armour.

In her nonfiction book WASPs: The Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II, author Vera S. Williams outlines the origins of the program, detailing the roles of General "Hap" Arnold, Jackie Cochran, and Nancy Love. She also describes the lifestyle, duties, and accomplishments of the women and gives other relevant historical information. Some of the women's main jobs (all of them domestic) were towing targets in the air for target practice, testing new and repaired aircraft, ferrying planes from factories to bases, and simulating situations to help the male cadets prepare for combat. To my delight, the book draws on some great sources to tell the story of the WASPs. Passages from interviews that the author conducted, photographs, newspaper clippings, and transcripts of songs fill its pages. The variety of sources and the direct writing style make this book both fascinating and accessible to all kinds of readers.

I immensely enjoyed reading this text, and that is really saying something, because nonfiction can be difficult for me to get through. It was nice to delve deeper into this subject to get the full story. If you are curious about one of the ways that women served their country during World War II, check out WASPs: The Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II by Vera S. Williams.



WASPs of WWII

(Books, History) Permanent link

During World War II, two disadvantaged groups got to serve their country as aviators. One group was the Tuskegee Airmen, composed of African American males. The other group was the WASPs: Women Airforce Service Pilots. Unfortunately, neither group welcomed black females. If you want to be inspired by black female aviators, read up on Bessie Coleman, Janet Harmon Bragg, and the contemporary superstar Vernice Armour.

In her nonfiction book WASPs: The Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II, author Vera S. Williams outlines the origins of the program, detailing the roles of General "Hap" Arnold, Jackie Cochran, and Nancy Love. She also describes the lifestyle, duties, and accomplishments of the women and gives other relevant historical information. Some of the women's main jobs (all of them domestic) were towing targets in the air for target practice, testing new and repaired aircraft, ferrying planes from factories to bases, and simulating situations to help the male cadets prepare for combat. To my delight, the book draws on some great sources to tell the story of the WASPs. Passages from interviews that the author conducted, photographs, newspaper clippings, and transcripts of songs fill its pages. The variety of sources and the direct writing style make this book both fascinating and accessible to all kinds of readers.

I immensely enjoyed reading this text, and that is really saying something, because nonfiction can be difficult for me to get through. It was nice to delve deeper into this subject to get the full story. If you are curious about one of the ways that women served their country during World War II, check out WASPs: The Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II by Vera S. Williams.

Posted by Elyse Malnekoff at 03/30/2017 09:00:05 AM