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Staff Picks: Books

Miles Morales: Spiderman

Confession: I have Peter Parker fatigue. He’s had seven movies in the past two decades, more if you count the Avengers, and the story’s always the same: spider bite, ditch the glasses, fight a goblin. To be honest, I’m over it.

So last year, when I saw MilesMorales: Spiderman hit the shelves, and written by all-star YA novelist Jason Reynolds no less, I was intrigued. The familiar hero was getting a much need update.  But after watching the dazzling movie that introduces the new Black and Puerto-Rican web slinger to the big screen, I knew that I needed to read this novel immediately.

 I was delighted to find out more about Morales’ world—the strained and complicated relationship between his dad and his uncle, and to see what a solid friendship he has with his roommate Ganke. But then as the story continues to unfold it becomes clear that this Spiderman isn’t just duking it out with a giant lizard man or whatever. That’s too easy. The first Black Spiderman in the MCU takes on one of the most powerful enemies facing the Black community today: institutional racism. This novel pulls no punches and examines important issues while sacrificing none of the excitement and action-packed antics that we’ve come to expect out of our Spiderman stories.

Your twelve year old might say they hate reading, but have they read about Miles Morales? 



Miles Morales: Spiderman

(Books, Fiction, Kids, Teens, Tweens) Permanent link

Confession: I have Peter Parker fatigue. He’s had seven movies in the past two decades, more if you count the Avengers, and the story’s always the same: spider bite, ditch the glasses, fight a goblin. To be honest, I’m over it.

So last year, when I saw MilesMorales: Spiderman hit the shelves, and written by all-star YA novelist Jason Reynolds no less, I was intrigued. The familiar hero was getting a much need update.  But after watching the dazzling movie that introduces the new Black and Puerto-Rican web slinger to the big screen, I knew that I needed to read this novel immediately.

 I was delighted to find out more about Morales’ world—the strained and complicated relationship between his dad and his uncle, and to see what a solid friendship he has with his roommate Ganke. But then as the story continues to unfold it becomes clear that this Spiderman isn’t just duking it out with a giant lizard man or whatever. That’s too easy. The first Black Spiderman in the MCU takes on one of the most powerful enemies facing the Black community today: institutional racism. This novel pulls no punches and examines important issues while sacrificing none of the excitement and action-packed antics that we’ve come to expect out of our Spiderman stories.

Your twelve year old might say they hate reading, but have they read about Miles Morales? 

Posted by Milan Harden at 12/19/2018 03:22:55 PM