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Love Part 11: Dante says Love is a Circle

Like Johnny Cash, Dante thinks love is a ring, a circle, a sphere. He depicts love literally as a circle turning the cosmos, powering the world; it's at the center; love makes the world go 'round:

“The nature of the universe which holds the centre quiet, and moves all the rest around it, begins here as from its starting-point. And this heaven has no otherwhere than the Divine Mind, wherein is kindled the love that revolves it, and the virtue which it rains down. Light and love enclose it with one circle, even as it does the others, and of that cincture He who girds it is the sole Intelligence.” And “On that Point Heaven and all nature are dependent. Look on that circle…its motion is so swift because of the burning love whereby it is spurred.”

And, talking about love and the Virgin Mary:

“And when the brightness and the magnitude of the living star, which up there conquers as it conqured here below, were depicted in both my eyes, from within the mid heavens a torch, formed in a circle in fashion of a crown, descended and engirt her [Virgin Mary], and revolved around her.Whatever melody sounds sweetest here below…would seem a cloud.” “I am Angelic Love, and I circle round the lofty joy which breathes from out the womb which was the hostelry of our Desire…Thus the circling melody sealed itself.”

And at end of his creeping and crawling through hell and heaven, Dante concludes:

“O abundant Grace, whereby I presumed to fix my look through Eternal Light…I saw that in its depth is enclosed, bound up with love in one volume, that which is dispersed in leaves through the universe…that of which I speak is one simple Light” and “the lofty Light appeared to me three circles of three colors” and “my desire and my will were revolved, like a wheel which is moved evenly, by the Love which moves the sun and the other stars.”

The Divine Comedy has been called the “summa in verse,” i.e. Aquinas in epic poetry, for good reason. The actual ideas are not original, but the portrayal--the story, the images, the symbolism--is new. Literature is great for this. Aquinas’s doctrine is oozing at the cracks; but it is filled with Aristotle, and the bible, and Saints, Achilles, and various history political figures—all which makes me really appreciate anew how the history of Western thought is connected even more than I thought. This really is a "great conversation." The Divine Comedy has also been called an encyclopedia, which back then meant “circle of knowledge.” Like an encyclopedia, the narrative was meant to be educational on the topics of science (Aristotle), metaphysics and theology, politics (he was writing it as a political exile, which reminds me of Machiavelli), and ethics. Also, like a circle, the narrative begins at one point, goes through hell-purgatory-heaven, and ends at the same point with a new perspective.

Loving well and loving the right things is an art that requires wisdom; this has come up many times. Love is like wax, says God to Dante in purgatory--"the wax be good," "but not every seal is good although the wax is good." The wax is love, which is naturally perfect. The seal is how we use that love, what we attach it to. But Dante responds that, if love does not come from us, how can we be free? “For if love be offered to us from without, and if the soul go not with other foot, it is not her own [the soul’s] merit if she go strait or crooked.” Are we pulled around by love desires, slaves of passion, as Hume would say? God responds no, there is “free will,” an “innate liberty;” the “virtue that counsels,” which “gathers in and windows good and evil loves”—“in you exists the power to restrain it.”

Remember that for Plato, Aristotle and Epictetus, love was a matter of wisdom and knowledge first and foremost—you have to figure out what to love before you can love. Dante says “for the good, inasmuch as it is good, so soon as it is understood, kindles love.” First comes understanding, then comes love. This is very different from simply having a disposition to love everything, whether good or not. This is a picky and choosy love, one that says “this is good” but “that’s not good.” However, we could wonder, how many times are we wrong about what is good? How many times are we wrong about what we should not love?  And what if our “philosophical arguments” and our “authority” figures (Dantes’ sources) are wrong? How does our love suffer? And how should we correct it now, before it's too late?

Related Posts
Love Part 1: Platonic Love
Love Part 2: Aristotle
Love Part 3: Epictetus and stoic love 
Love Part 4: Marcus Aurelius
Love Part 5: Plotinus 
Love Part 6: the Buddha
Love Part 7: Christian Love
Love Part 8: Augustine
Love Part 9: Martin Luther King, Jr
Love Part 10: Aquinas 

book

The Divine Comedy
9780385506786


Love Part 11: Dante says Love is a Circle

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Like Johnny Cash, Dante thinks love is a ring, a circle, a sphere. He depicts love literally as a circle turning the cosmos, powering the world; it's at the center; love makes the world go 'round:

“The nature of the universe which holds the centre quiet, and moves all the rest around it, begins here as from its starting-point. And this heaven has no otherwhere than the Divine Mind, wherein is kindled the love that revolves it, and the virtue which it rains down. Light and love enclose it with one circle, even as it does the others, and of that cincture He who girds it is the sole Intelligence.” And “On that Point Heaven and all nature are dependent. Look on that circle…its motion is so swift because of the burning love whereby it is spurred.”

And, talking about love and the Virgin Mary:

“And when the brightness and the magnitude of the living star, which up there conquers as it conqured here below, were depicted in both my eyes, from within the mid heavens a torch, formed in a circle in fashion of a crown, descended and engirt her [Virgin Mary], and revolved around her.Whatever melody sounds sweetest here below…would seem a cloud.” “I am Angelic Love, and I circle round the lofty joy which breathes from out the womb which was the hostelry of our Desire…Thus the circling melody sealed itself.”

And at end of his creeping and crawling through hell and heaven, Dante concludes:

“O abundant Grace, whereby I presumed to fix my look through Eternal Light…I saw that in its depth is enclosed, bound up with love in one volume, that which is dispersed in leaves through the universe…that of which I speak is one simple Light” and “the lofty Light appeared to me three circles of three colors” and “my desire and my will were revolved, like a wheel which is moved evenly, by the Love which moves the sun and the other stars.”

The Divine Comedy has been called the “summa in verse,” i.e. Aquinas in epic poetry, for good reason. The actual ideas are not original, but the portrayal--the story, the images, the symbolism--is new. Literature is great for this. Aquinas’s doctrine is oozing at the cracks; but it is filled with Aristotle, and the bible, and Saints, Achilles, and various history political figures—all which makes me really appreciate anew how the history of Western thought is connected even more than I thought. This really is a "great conversation." The Divine Comedy has also been called an encyclopedia, which back then meant “circle of knowledge.” Like an encyclopedia, the narrative was meant to be educational on the topics of science (Aristotle), metaphysics and theology, politics (he was writing it as a political exile, which reminds me of Machiavelli), and ethics. Also, like a circle, the narrative begins at one point, goes through hell-purgatory-heaven, and ends at the same point with a new perspective.

Loving well and loving the right things is an art that requires wisdom; this has come up many times. Love is like wax, says God to Dante in purgatory--"the wax be good," "but not every seal is good although the wax is good." The wax is love, which is naturally perfect. The seal is how we use that love, what we attach it to. But Dante responds that, if love does not come from us, how can we be free? “For if love be offered to us from without, and if the soul go not with other foot, it is not her own [the soul’s] merit if she go strait or crooked.” Are we pulled around by love desires, slaves of passion, as Hume would say? God responds no, there is “free will,” an “innate liberty;” the “virtue that counsels,” which “gathers in and windows good and evil loves”—“in you exists the power to restrain it.”

Remember that for Plato, Aristotle and Epictetus, love was a matter of wisdom and knowledge first and foremost—you have to figure out what to love before you can love. Dante says “for the good, inasmuch as it is good, so soon as it is understood, kindles love.” First comes understanding, then comes love. This is very different from simply having a disposition to love everything, whether good or not. This is a picky and choosy love, one that says “this is good” but “that’s not good.” However, we could wonder, how many times are we wrong about what is good? How many times are we wrong about what we should not love?  And what if our “philosophical arguments” and our “authority” figures (Dantes’ sources) are wrong? How does our love suffer? And how should we correct it now, before it's too late?

Related Posts
Love Part 1: Platonic Love
Love Part 2: Aristotle
Love Part 3: Epictetus and stoic love 
Love Part 4: Marcus Aurelius
Love Part 5: Plotinus 
Love Part 6: the Buddha
Love Part 7: Christian Love
Love Part 8: Augustine
Love Part 9: Martin Luther King, Jr
Love Part 10: Aquinas 

book

The Divine Comedy
9780385506786

Posted by Matt Smith at 08/11/2011 09:38:25 AM