New Materials

New Materials Archives: 2014201320122011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

December 2012

Gardens of Art: The Sculpture Park at the Frederik Meijer Gardens  by Joseph  BechererGardens of Art: The Sculpture Park at the Frederik Meijer Gardens  
Becherer, Joseph
Call Number: H 730 B391
2002
A brief history describes the development of the sculpture park. Biographies of the artists whose art grace this private collection are included, which serves to broaden the viewer's understanding of the pieces. Attention is given both to the artists' development of their craft and to the part each sculpture plays in the garden as a whole.
Michigan Barns, Et Cetera: Rural Buildings of the Great Lake State by Jerry  DavisMichigan Barns, Et Cetera: Rural Buildings of the Great Lake State  
Davis, Jerry
Call Number: H 725.372 D2625
2011
This skillfully illustrated book features fifty images of barns, covered bridges, churches, and other rural buildings throughout Michigan. Each drawing is enhanced by a short vignette containing interesting facts, figures, and anecdotes about the featured structure.
The Lone Wolverine: Tracking Michigan's Most Elusive Animal by Elizabeth  ShawThe Lone Wolverine: Tracking Michigan's Most Elusive Animal  
Shaw, Elizabeth
Call Number: H 599.766 S5345
2012
It began in late winter of 2004. Almost 100 years had passed since the last spotting of a wild wolverine in Michigan when coyote hunters caught a glimpse of one of the animals in a frozen farm field in the northern thumb region. For the next six years, Jeff Ford, a local science teacher and amateur naturalist, devoted himself to locating and filming the wolverine that had unexpectedly and inexplicably appeared in the Wolverine State. By the time hikers found the animal dead in early 2010, Ford had taken hundreds of rare live action photos and shot numerous hours of video, with the story of the "Wolverine Guy" attracting national attention through countless newspaper and magazine articles and appearances on Animal Planet and PBSNature.This is the tale of Ford's quest as he uncovered answers to mysteries surrounding the animal's territory and movement patterns, while sparking a flurry of controversy surrounding the elusive predator's origin, much of which remains unresolved today. It's an intimate look at research in the raw, from DNA samples stuck on barbed wire to a sophisticated, motion-sensing infrared camera unit strategically placed to observe nocturnal behavior.
German-Americans in the American Revolution: Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards' History  by  German-Americans in the American Revolution: Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards' History  
Call Number: H 973.346 R515
2008
Considered the definitive history of the involvement of German-Americans in the American Revolution, this work was originally published in 1908 and has long been out of print. It focuses on Pennsylvania and surrounding colonies, where the colonial German element was concentrated, and contains extensive biographical information of value to genealogists and historians.
The Making of a Mining District: Keweenaw Native Copper 1500-1870 by David  KrauseThe Making of a Mining District: Keweenaw Native Copper 1500-1870  
Krause, David
Call Number: H 977.499 K913
1992
A critical examination of the people and events that led to the gradual recognition of the mining potential of the unique native copper deposits of Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula, which culminated in the first great mining boom in American history.
Grand Times in Grand Rapids: Pieces of Furniture City History by Gordon BeldGrand Times in Grand Rapids: Pieces of Furniture City History  
Beld, Gordon
Call Number: H 977.456 B427
2012
Join longtime journalist Gordon Beld on a history Gleaned from the best of Beld's work for Grand Rapids Magazine, this collection weaves together intriguing vignettes. Get a glimpse into the lives of famous leaders Gerald Ford and Arthur Vandenberg and marvel at Harry "Human Fly" Gardiner, who scaled the buildings of downtown Grand Rapids. Take a nostalgic trip down to Reed's Lake, where the streetcars will drop you off at Ramona Gardens to dance the night away.
Lost & Found: Legendary Lake Michigan Shipwrecks  by Valerie VanHeestLost & Found: Legendary Lake Michigan Shipwrecks  
VanHeest, Valerie
Call Number: H 977.4 V255
2012
The many shipwrecks presented in Lost and Found became even more famous after their discoveries than at the time of their losses, gaining notoriety as historic attractions, archaeological sites, and in some cases, over bold salvage attempts or precedent- setting legal battles. Through riveting narrative, the award-winning author and explorer takes the readers back in time to experience the careers and tragic sinkings of these ships, then beneath the lake to participate in the triumphant discovery and exciting exploration of their remains and the circumstances that led to their status as legendary shipwrecks. The vessels in this comprehensive publication span the age of sail, steam, and diesel on the Great Lakes from the earliest schooners to the sidewheel steamers, propellers, carferries, self-unloaders, and yachts.
Finland-Swedes in Michigan by Mika RoinilaFinland-Swedes in Michigan  
Roinila, Mika
Call Number: H 977.4004 R7412
2012
Part of a series devoted to the diverse ethnic communities in Michigan, this volume tells the story of a little-studied group, the Swedish speaking Finns who immigrated to the United States mainly in the first third of the 20th century. Following an introductory history to their emigration to the U.S. in general, the text describes the lives and occupations of the Finland-Swedes in Michigan and the various organizations and churches they formed there, along with a wealth of statistical information, b&w images, and a selection of traditional recipes.
Swedes in Michigan by Rebecca  MeadSwedes in Michigan  
Mead, Rebecca
Call Number: H 977.4004 M4798
2012
Influenced by conflict with the Lutheran Church, economic deterioration, and lack of land for agriculture, approximately 1.2 million Swedes emigrated to the United States from 1851 to 1930. Mead (history, Northern Michigan U.) reports on the establishment of Swedish immigrants in farming, mining, fishing, railroad construction, and urban manufacturing. Swedish immigration appeared primarily in the upper Midwest, but the focus here is strictly on the situation in Michigan.
River Roads to Freedom: Fugitive Slave Notices and Sheriff Notices Found in Illinois Sources  by Helen  TregillisRiver Roads to Freedom: Fugitive Slave Notices and Sheriff Notices Found in Illinois Sources  
Tregillis, Helen
Call Number: H 929.3773 R6212
2012
The Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers were major thoroughfares for the Underground Railroad which had waystations in Illinois. Although Illinois was admitted to the Union as a free state (1818), it passed laws which made it risky for a runaway slave to be found within its borders. Advertisements were placed in Illinois newspapers by owners from Kentucky, Alabama, Tennessee, and Virginia in search of runaways, as well as by Illinois residents who had found runaways that they wanted claimed. While the slaves were black, the advertisers were predominently white, so both races are about equally represented in this volume. The notices usually give the name, age, and physical description of the runaways, and the name and addresses of the advertiser. The notices in this major new work were abstracted from fourteen Illinois newspapers for the years 1816 through 1850.
Genealogical Abstracts From Newspapers of the German Reformed Church, 1830-1839  by Barbara ManningGenealogical Abstracts From Newspapers of the German Reformed Church, 1830-1839  
Manning, Barbara
Call Number: H 929.343 M2833
2012
Lively and replete with names, this book is a must for everyone, not only those with German-speaking ancestors. Founded in 1827 in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to support missionaries in the Indian Territory, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, “The Weekly Messenger of the German Reformed Church” soon became a huge success. Pastors began sending in, together with their subscription money, notices of deaths and marriages and other interesting bits of information, not only about members of their church but about anybody they knew. The newspaper gave fascinating details on marriages, deaths, parsons taking up new posts, appointments complete with lists of references, reports of accidents, murders (“the fiendish influence of Intemperance”), arrests, convictions, hangings, and even good news, of the founding of scholarships and acts of human kindness ($30,000 returned by honest hack driver). As far as locale is concerned, entries are not limited to happenings in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and the Carolinas, but stretch as far as Florida, Missouri, Michigan (more than twenty-two states in all) and even Europe and Asia.
Civil War Veterans in the 20th Century by Harry  WoodworthCivil War Veterans in the 20th Century  
Woodworth, Harry
Call Number: H 973.7 W9125
2012
This book is about those who fought the Civil War. The genealogy of these veterans is revealed using obituaries. Although abstracted from the Elizabeth Daily Journal, the vets were from many states. They were Union andConfederate, black and white, men and women. Many descended from named 17th century immigrants. Others were recent immigrants, coming in either as a child, or as an adult, some being vets of Old Country wars. Some left large families, with 5 generations mentioned. Father and son vets are revealed, as are marriages between children of vets. Black vets include those who fled slavery to the North and those who fought for the Confederacy. Some mention the plantation where they were born, and their owner from whom they received their name. Journal articles relay vets’ experiences in battle. The final Gettysburg Blue and Gray Reunion shows how time mellowed war hatred.
Buildings of Michigan by Kathryn EckertBuildings of Michigan  
Eckert, Kathryn
Call Number: H 720.9774 E19U
2012
The revised edition of Buildings of Michigan is really a companion edition to the original 1993 edition of the same title. A side-by-side comparison of this edition with the previous one demonstrates the toll that the economic recession, the financial crisis, and the decline of the Detroit auto industry have had upon the historic buildings of Michigan. About a quarter of the original entries are intact, while a full three-quarters have been edited, removed, or are entirely new to this revised edition.
Contested Territories: Native Americans and Non-Natives in the Lower Great Lakes, 1700-1850  by Charles Beatty MedinaContested Territories: Native Americans and Non-Natives in the Lower Great Lakes, 1700-1850  
Beatty Medina, Charles
Call Number: H 977.00497 C7619
2012
The essays in this collection examine the cultural evolution of Native American tribes in the Old Northwest as well as interactions with other cultures such as the French and the Quakers. They delve into the development of Native American identity, political activities and involvement, land, and religion.
Faith, Family, and Fortune: Reformed Upbringing and Calvinist Values of Highly Successful Dutch-American Entrepreneurs by Peter EsterFaith, Family, and Fortune: Reformed Upbringing and Calvinist Values of Highly Successful Dutch-American Entrepreneurs  
Ester, Peter
Call Number: H 325.249 E797
2012
Dutch-American entrepreneurs, so it seems, have done well. They have left their mark on the West Michigan economy. Apparently, many of these industrialists and manufacturers have the right entrepreneurial skills to be highly competitive in a challenging and dynamic market. It is not only their business competency, however, that counts. Most of these Dutch-American entrepreneurs are committed Protestants, active members of Reformed churches, and firm believers in Calvinist doctrines. Somehow, Calvinism and entrepreneurship go well together and, in combination, prospered in the American cultural context. To clarify this relationship is one of the main goals of this study.
Emigration from the United Kingdom to America: Lists of Passengers Arriving at U.S. Ports  by Ira GlazierEmigration from the United Kingdom to America: Lists of Passengers Arriving at U.S. Ports  
Glazier, Ira
Call Number: H 929.341 E539
2012
Continuing series, vols. 17 and 18, covering passenger lists for 1881.
2

November 2012

Ghost Ships, Gales, and Forgotten Tales: True Adventures of the Great Lakes  by Wes OleszewskiGhost Ships, Gales, and Forgotten Tales: True Adventures of the Great Lakes  
Oleszewski, Wes
Call Number: H 977 O45.5
1995
None of the stories contained within these pages are of fiction. Each is a narrative of an actual occurrence, the thrilling drama of the ordeal and the tragedy of the losses are real and need no exaggeration. The tales here will be of the obscure events that have been under-reported or forgotten altogether.
Secret Witness: The Untold Story of the 1967 Bombing in Marshall, Michigan by Blaine PardoeSecret Witness: The Untold Story of the 1967 Bombing in Marshall, Michigan  
Pardoe, Blaine
Call Number: H 364.1523 P226
2012
Secret Witness brings to light startling new evidence and freshly uncovered facts to address questions that, to this day, surround one of Michigan's most brutal murders. Based on extensive interviews with surviving prosecutors, police, and witnesses, Blaine Pardoe re-creates the investigation that pried into Marshall's dark underbelly and uncovered the seamy private lives led by some of the town's citizenry but led to only tenuous theories about the bombing. The book also examines the pivotal role played by the Secret Witness program, an initiative by the Detroit News that offered rewards for anonymous tips related to violent crimes. What's ultimately revealed is the true depth of evil that occurred in Marshall that day. Every small town has dirty little secrets. This time, they were deadly.
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1855-1868 by Raymond  LantzOttawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1855-1868  
Lantz, Raymond
Call Number: H 929.3774 L2967
2006
Arranged by band and uses such sources as the 1855 Ottawa and Chippewa Annuity Roll, per capita rolls, and the goods and supplies lists.
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1870-1909 by Raymond  LantzOttawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1870-1909  
Lantz, Raymond
Call Number: H 929.3774 L2967.1
2006
Contains 3 transcriptions of censuses: 1870 census and annuity payment records of the Grand River, Mackinac, Sault Ste. Marie and Traverse Bands of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Mich.; a listing of those persons in the 1870 enumeration and all their known descendants, as found living on a special enumeration made on 4 Mar. 1907; a listing of children born after 4 Mar. 1907, and before 1 Aug. 1909.
Michigan's German Heritage by John  RussellMichigan's German Heritage  
Russell, John
Call Number: H 977.4004 R9645
1994
Today, German-Americans amount to 29% of Michigan's population, thereby making them the state's largest ethnic group. You would believe that any history of the state of Michigan would have to include the contributions of the German-American population, as they are nearly one-third of the state's entire population. But in 1927, when this history was written, this was not the case due to the anti-German feelings prevalent at the time. John Andrew Russell, acutely aware of this discrepancy, wrote his history to help these ignored people feel proud of themselves and their ancestors for their part in the settlement and growth of the state of Michigan. This work provides a comprehensive survey of the history of German immigration and settlement, and the growth and development of German-American institutions, as well as contributions made by German-Americans to the building of the state. It contains a great deal of information on local and county history in Michigan, as well as extensive biographical and bibliographical information.
A Pictorial History of Barns and Other Farm Structures in Michigan by Kate PickvetA Pictorial History of Barns and Other Farm Structures in Michigan  
Pickvet, Kate
Call Number: H 725.372 P5979
2004
History of Michigan barns and agriculture. Includes many photos. Indexed and sourced.
Forgotten Black Soldiers Who Served in White Regiments During the Civil War by Juanita  MossForgotten Black Soldiers Who Served in White Regiments During the Civil War  
Moss, Juanita
Call Number: H 973.7 M9134
2008
After having been told by several historians that there had been no black soldiers serving in white regiments, the author made a hypothesis that if there had been one such black soldier in a white regiment, as she knew, then there might have been others. This book traces her ten-year journey to find such proof. She concludes that the hundreds of forgotten names she has found should be enough for the "nay-sayers" to conclude that black men indeed did serve in white regiments, even the Medal of Honor winner, Bruce Anderson of the 142nd New York Infantry.The author believes that historians and Civil War "buffs" alike will find new information revealed in this book, even though 143 years have passed since the last shot of the war was fired. Civil War history is still amazingly of great interest to many people and new facts continue to be uncovered. Perhaps an interested reader will want to continue to add to the still incomplete list of nearly 2,000 black soldiers who served in white regiments during the Civil War.
Black Indian Genealogy Research: African-American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes  by Angela  Walton-RajiBlack Indian Genealogy Research: African-American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes  
Walton-Raji, Angela
Call Number: H 929.3396 W2413
2007
Shows where to find and how to use the Indian Freedman Records, discusses Black Indians and Tri-Racial groups, explores the lifestyle of Indian ancestors, presents numerous case studies, and much more.
An Index of African Americans Identified in Selected Records of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands  by Jacqueline LawsonAn Index of African Americans Identified in Selected Records of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands  
Lawson, Jacqueline
Call Number: H 929.3396 L424
2008
Three indexes in one. First is a list of African Americans identified in letters that contained fewer than 24 names; identifies person's full name, date correspondence was received, location from which the letter originated, brief description of contents and detailed information for finding the name in the original BRFAL records. An appendix includes, when known, names and locations of former owners of the freedmen and women. Second, is an index of people who appeared in lists of 24 or more names, such as petitions, which are included in many of the letters. As in the first index, all the information needed to find the names in the original records is easily accessible. The third index lists nearly 1,200 names of African Americans sent from the District of Columbia to work under contracts approved by the BRFAL; includes age of person, wage paid and city and state to which person was sent.
Bounties to Black Soldiers by William BelknapBounties to Black Soldiers  
Belknap, William
Call Number: H 973.7415 U5882
2009
This volume records the proceedings of a commission appointed by Special Orders No. 189 of the War Department, Bureau Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. "This commission was, by the terms of the order, assembled for the purpose of a careful hearing of complaints of claimants for government bounty, made against officers or agents of this bureau, or other persons concerned in the payment of bounties to colored soldiers, sailors, and marines. And the commission proceeded, accordingly thoroughly to investigate the subject of the payment of bounties, in order to ascertain, if possible, not only whether the charges preferred, but also whether any charges whatever could be substantiated. The commission conceived it to be their duty fully to investigate and make clear the nature and extent of the frauds committed upon claimants, as well as the causes which had given rise to rumors of fraud which the commission might discover to be without foundation." These proceedings occurred over a span of fifty-one days in both Tennessee and Alabama.
Using Register Offices for English & Welsh Certificates by Penelope ChristensenUsing Register Offices for English & Welsh Certificates  
Christensen, Penelope
Call Number: H 929.342 C5548
2001
Revised millennial edition of a favorite money-saver! Contains all Registration Districts from 1837 to date, showing how to obtain birth, marriage and death certificates for half the price!District List 1837-1965 by numbered area for those hard-to-decipher names. Plus websites & E-mail addresses.
Researching English & Welsh Civil Registration Records by Penelope ChristensenResearching English & Welsh Civil Registration Records  
Christensen, Penelope
Call Number: H 929.342 C5548.1
2001
Obtaining birth, marriage and death certificates is an essential element of good genealogical research. It is not always an easy process. Here are the practical details needed to understand the system, use the indexes and find and interpret the certificates.
History of the Ordinance of 1787 and the Old Northwest Territory  by Harlow LindleyHistory of the Ordinance of 1787 and the Old Northwest Territory  
Lindley, Harlow
Call Number: H 977 H67392
2004
Prepared for the Northwest territory celebration commission under the direction of a committee representing the states of the Northwest territory.
2

October 2012

Sue Parish Memoirs  by Suzanne  ParishSue Parish Memoirs  
Parish, Suzanne
Call Number: H 921 P233
2012
Suzanne Upjohn DeLano Parish - daughter, equestrian, pilot, mother, thespian, photographer, museum founder, history maker - was an accomplished pioneer of the 20th century. Her talents were many and infused with her love of life. Her passionate determination and positive spirit were perhaps best embodied in the way she balanced family and flying, an inspiration for all time.--From the book cover.
Mastering Family, Library & Church Records  by W. Daniel QuillenMastering Family, Library & Church Records  
Quillen, W. Daniel
Call Number: H 929.1 Q67.2
2012
Many genealogists—beginners as well as experienced researchers—overlook records that are often available at their fingertips. Quillen helps genealogists find, explore and extract the most relevant information from these records. Family records often supply genealogists with far more information than most individuals are aware. Sources such as family bibles, legal papers, letters, and even old photos can provide great data.Church records in particular are routinely overlooked but can provide a wealth of genealogical information, often extending family trees back—and forward—several generations. Libraries are often great depositories of information that go unsearched.
Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of the Grampian Highlands  by David DobsonScottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of the Grampian Highlands  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.17
2008
The Grampian Highlands stretch from the Braes of Angus in the south, north-eastwards following a geological fault line known as the Highland Line to Aberdeenshire, then west as far as Strathspey. The region embraces the mountainous areas of Angus, Kincardineshire, Aberdeenshire, Banffshire, and Morayshire but does not include the fertile coastal plain nor Strathmore. While the present volume is not a comprehensive directory of all of the Grampian Highlanders, it does pull together references on 1,500 18th-century inhabitants from that region.
Illinois Census Returns, 1820  by Margaret  NortonIllinois Census Returns, 1820  
Norton, Margaret
Call Number: H 929.3773 I2923
2011
This work is devoted principally to the 1820 state census of Illinois. It contains notes comparing all discrepancies between names in the 1818 territorial, the 1820 state, and the 1820 federal censuses. The arrangement of the text is by counties, and there are 11,547 heads of families listed, representing over 50,000 individuals.
A Guide to Chicago and Midwestern Polish-American Genealogy  by Jason KruskiA Guide to Chicago and Midwestern Polish-American Genealogy  
Kruski, Jason
Call Number: H 929.3438 K947
2012
The first comprehensive introduction to Polish genealogy in years. Since Polish-Americans proliferate in Chicago and the U.S. Midwest, they are the focus; however, much of the advice set forth here will apply to the majority of U.S. residents of Polish Catholic origin, as well as to records in Poland themselves. Since Polish immigration to the United States began in earnest following the American Civil War, and was heaviest during the last quarter of the nineteenth and first quarter of the twentieth century, this era is the chronological focal point of the work.
Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Argyll by David DobsonScottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Argyll  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.18
2012
Volumes 1 and 2. These volumes pull together references on nearly 3,000 18th-century inhabitants. Coverage extends to all parishes within Argyll, with the exception of the Isle of Jura, which has been dealt with elsewhere in print. In all cases, Mr. Dobson gives each Highlander's name, a place within Argyll (birth, residence, employment, etc.), a date, and the source. In some cases, we also learn the identities of relatives, the individual's employment, vessel traveled on, and so forth.
Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Highland Perthshire  by David  DobsonScottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Highland Perthshire  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.16
2006
This book deals with the location from whence some of the Jacobite transportees of 1746 and most of the pioneer emigrants who sailed on the Commerce to New York in 1775 originated. While the present volume is not a comprehensive directory of all the people of Perthshire during the mid-18th century, it does pull together references on more than 1,200 18th-century inhabitants. Coverage extends to all regions within Perthshire. In all cases, Mr. Dobson gives each Highlander's name, a place within Perthshire (birth, residence, employment, etc.), a date, and the source. In some cases, we also learn the identities of relatives, the individual's employment, vessel traveled on, and so forth.
Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Inverness-shire  by David DobsonScottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of Inverness-shire  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.15
2007
While this volume is not a comprehensive directory of all the people of Inverness-shire during the mid-18th century, it does pull together references on more than 2,100 18th-century inhabitants. Coverage extends to all regions within Inverness. In all cases, Mr. Dobson gives each Highlander's name, a place within Inverness-shire (birth, residence, employment, etc.), a date, and the source. In some cases, we also learn the identities of relatives, the individual's employment, vessel traveled on, and so forth.
Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of the Northern Isles  by David DobsonScottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The People of the Northern Isles  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.14
2008
The Northern Isles were once isolated on the northwest fringes of Europe; however, as trans-Atlantic trade expanded, they found themselves astride a major sea route between North America and northern Europe. Stromness in the Orkneys became the first or last port of call for many vessels crossing the Atlantic; for example, the vessels of the Hudson Bay Company from the late 17th-century traveled from Stromness to North America. For most Orkney emigrants, the motivating factors were poverty and lack of opportunity. Also noteworthy is that, unlike the other Highlanders, the Northern Islanders were of Scandinavian, not Celtic, origin (with an element of Lowland Scots). While this volume is not a comprehensive directory of all the Orkney and Shetland Islander emigrants during the mid-18th century, it does pull together references on more than 1,000 18th-century inhabitants. In all cases, Mr. Dobson gives each Highlander's name, a locality within the Northern Isles (place of birth, residence, employment, etc.), a date, and the source. In some cases, readers also learn the identities of relatives, the individual's employment, vessel traveled on, and so forth.
Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The Northern Highlands  by David DobsonScottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775: The Northern Highlands  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.13
2007
The Northern Highlanders were among the pioneers of colonial Georgia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New York, and the Canadian Maritimes. Among the vessels that brought them to these places were the Hector to Nova Scotia in 1773, the Friendship to Philadelphia in 1774, and the Peace and Plenty to New York in 1774. While this volume is not a comprehensive directory of all people living in the Northern Highlands during the mid-18th century, it does pull together references to more than 2,100 18th-century inhabitants. In all cases, Dr. Dobson gives each Highlander's name, a place name or county within the Highlands, a date (of birth, residence, etc.), and the source. In the majority of cases, we also learn the identities of relatives, the individual's employment, vessel traveled, or other defining characteristic. Among the primary sources Dr. Dobson consulted were the Northern Highland militia lists naming the participants who opposed the Jacobites in 1745-1746.
"First census" of Kentucky 1790  
Heinemann, Charles
Call Number: H 929.3769 H4685
2012
The first two federal censuses of Kentucky no longer exist; therefore, this "first census" of 1790 was developed from tax lists rather than population schedules. The territory covered includes the nine counties that comprised the entire State of Kentucky in 1790. Following the names of each of the 9,000 taxpayers are the name of the county of residence and the date of the return. At the rear of the book are the 1787 and 1788 tax lists for Fayette County, reproduced from another source.
The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames: With a Vocabulary of Christian Names  by Clifford  SimsThe Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames: With a Vocabulary of Christian Names  
Sims, Clifford
Call Number: H 929.42 S6142
2000
Reprint of a 19th century book which details the origin and meaning of Scottish surnames.
Ships from Scotland to America, 1628-1828 by David DobsonShips from Scotland to America, 1628-1828  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.3
2011
Volumes 3 and 4 in this continuing series.
The Amphibians and Reptiles of Michigan: A Quaternary and Recent Faunal Adventure  by J. Alan HolmanThe Amphibians and Reptiles of Michigan: A Quaternary and Recent Faunal Adventure  
Holman, J. Alan
Call Number: H 597.8 H7476
2012
A comprehensive look at Michigan amphibians and reptiles, spanning both recent and ancient times.
The Freedom-Seekers: Blacks in Early Canada  by Daniel  HillThe Freedom-Seekers: Blacks in Early Canada  
Hill, Daniel
Call Number: H 971 H6455
1992
Black Loyalists and their families were among the first settlers in Nova Scotia and Upper Canada. As abolition movements and the Underground Railroad gained support, Black slaves and refugees flooded into Canada determined to build new lives for themselves and their children. The Freedom-Seekers chronicles the phenomenal success story of their struggle to break the chains of slavery and gain the full rights of citizenship in their adopted country.
Cemeteries of Berrien County, Michigan. Niles Township  by Berrien County Genealogical Society Cemeteries of Berrien County, Michigan. Niles Township  
Call Number: H 977.411 C3944NILE
2012
Maps and transcriptions of Niles Township cemeteries in Berrien County.
2

September 2012

Dare to Know [videorecording]: Celebrating the Ladies' Library Association of Kalamazoo, Michigan  by Paula   JamisonDare to Know [videorecording]: Celebrating the Ladies' Library Association of Kalamazoo, Michigan  
Jamison, Paula
Call Number: H DVD 369.082 D217
2012
This hour-long television program celebrates the long and rich history of the Ladies' Library Association of Kalamazoo, the oldest women's organization in Michigan, the third oldest in the United States, and the first in the nation to finance and build its own building. Includes an hour of special features.
Tracing Your Irish and British Roots  by W. Daniel QuillenTracing Your Irish and British Roots  
Quillen, W. Daniel
Call Number: H 929.341 Q67
2012
More than 63 million Americans claim Irish or British ancestry, over 22% of our population. And many of those 63 million are searching for their ancestral roots. Most won't go back many generations before they have to "leap across the pond" in search of their ancestors, and Vol. V in Quillen's Essentials of Genealogy helps budding genealogists do just that. Topics addressed in the book include: -- Where to find Irish and British records -- How to access these records -- How to use the Internet to help you in your search -- Necessary preparations for a trip abroad to do research in these countries -- Pitfalls and issues in obtaining such records -- Research tips specifically geared for England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.
"Thus fell Tecumseh"  
Kuron, Frank
Call Number: H 970.00497 K9688
2011
How the great Shawnee Chief Tecumseh fell at the Battle of the Thames in 1813--and by whose hand--has been the subject of debate for almost 200 years. This edition presents quotes from more than 160 people who had something to say about the event.
Night of the Wind by Dan CherryNight of the Wind  
Cherry, Dan
Call Number: H 977.431 C5225.1
2002
The Palm Sunday tornado of April 11, 1965, remembered by those who were there.
Cleaning Up the Muss by Martin BerteraCleaning Up the Muss  
Bertera, Martin
Call Number: H 973.7 B537.3
2007
The Civil War letters of surgeon David P. Chamberlin to the Hudson Gazette newspaper.
The History of Addison, Michigan by Dan CherryThe History of Addison, Michigan  
Cherry, Dan
Call Number: H 977.431 C5225
1997
History of Addison from 1834 to 1996.
Yesterday and Today in Hudson  by Raymond  LennardYesterday and Today in Hudson  
Lennard, Raymond
Call Number: H 977.431 L567
2010
History of Hudson, Michigan in photographs.
Yesterday and Today at Devils Lake  by Raymond LennardYesterday and Today at Devils Lake  
Lennard, Raymond
Call Number: H 977.431 L567.1
2011
History of the Devils Lake region near Hudson, Michigan in photographs.
2

August 2012

Transition to Duty by Leo FloryTransition to Duty  
Flory, Leo
Call Number: H 921 F641
2011
A combat medic's tour in Vietnam with the 101st airborne Screaming Eagles.
Lenawee Reflections: Sept. 1988 - August 1989  by Charles  LindquistLenawee Reflections: Sept. 1988 - August 1989  
Lindquist, Charles
Call Number: H 977.431 L747.3
1992
Drawn from articles originally published during the first year of the author's "Lenawee reflections" column in the Adrian newspaper, the Daily Telegram.
The James Watson Family of Orange County, New York and Barry County, Michigan  by Ricky  WatsonThe James Watson Family of Orange County, New York and Barry County, Michigan  
Watson, Ricky
Call Number: H 929.2 W3385w
2010
Watson family history back to 1781.
Some Early Scots in Maritime Canada, Volume III by Terrence  PunchSome Early Scots in Maritime Canada, Volume III  
Punch, Terrence
Call Number: H 929.3411 P9842
2011
This final volume of Some Early Scots in Maritime Canada identifies thousands of Scots who immigrated to Maritime Canada in the years between the 1770s and the 1870s--most of them located by the author in a variety of obscure and out-of-the-way records. In fact, the variety of source records consulted is one of the volume’s strengths. From shipping records to passenger lists, from land petitions to census records, then from newspaper columns, vital records, church registers, and a host of fugitive sources, the sources utilized provide a rich trove of genealogical data. This volume differs from the previous volumes in the series in that explanatory material and brief essays accompany many of the articles.
Abstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland by V. L. SkinnerAbstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland  
Skinner, V. L.
Call Number: H 929.3752 S6285
Volume 38 in this continuing series.
Later Scots-Irish links, 1725-1825  by David DobsonLater Scots-Irish links, 1725-1825  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.11
2003
In the tradition of his earlier volumes of Scots-Irish links for the period 1575 to 1725, Mr. Dobson has picked up the trails of Scots living in Ulster and of Irish living in Scotland during the following hundred years.
2

July 2012

Wicked Ottawa County, Michigan  by Amberrose HammondWicked Ottawa County, Michigan  
Hammond, Amberrose
Call Number: H 977.415 H225
2011
Prepare for a harrowing ride into the seedy side of Ottawa County history as author Amberrose Hammond unearths morbid tales of sin, scandal and crime. The lovers you find here become enemies, and the jilted, jealous and mistreated favor weaponry to verbal resolution. Ku Klux Klan members don white gowns and leave fiery crosses blazing against the backdrop of night. In this Ottawa County, Eddie Bentz, Baby Face Nelson and a crew of thugs are spraying machine gun fire outside the People's Savings Bank in Grand Haven, arguments end in miserable fashion and the missing often turn up without the capacity to out their wrongdoers.
A Good Boat Speaks for Itself: Isle Royale Fishermen and Their Boats  by Timothy CochraneA Good Boat Speaks for Itself: Isle Royale Fishermen and Their Boats  
Cochrane, Timothy
Call Number: H 639.2 C6638
2002
An absorbing chronicle of fishing families who adapted to the rigors of Lake Superior and a valuable historical resource for anyone with an interest in wooden boats.
Searching for Flemish (Belgian) Ancestors  by Jozef  GoethalsSearching for Flemish (Belgian) Ancestors  
Goethals, Jozef
Call Number: H 929.3493 G599
2007
Mr. Goethals and Fr. Denys have prepared the first English-language guidebook for tracing Flemish ancestors from Belgium. Chapter One focuses on Flemish-American genealogical organizations, such as the Genealogical Society of Flemish Americans (GFSA). As the author points out, many Belgian records have been microfilmed by the LDS Church or are available on the Internet. Chapters Two and Three are devoted to the all-important vital records of the Civil Registry (1796-1900) and Flemish parish registers (1600-1796). Mr. Goethals translates sample records from each category into English from the original Flemish, French, and Latin. The final chapter discusses other types of records, such as court records (schepenenbank), orphan records (weezerie), tax lists (penningskohieren), and citizenship records (poorters en buiten-poorters).
The Surnames of North West Ireland by Brian MitchellThe Surnames of North West Ireland  
Mitchell, Brian
Call Number: H 929.42 M6812
2010
Concise histories of the major surnames of Gaelic and planter origin.
Family History: Digging Deeper  by Simon FowlerFamily History: Digging Deeper  
Fowler, Simon
Call Number: H 929.1 F788
2012
Joined by a team of expert genealogists, Simon Fowler covers a range of topics and provides clear advice for the intermediate genealogist. Helping you push back the barriers, this book details how to utilize the Internet in your research and suggests some unusual archives and records which might just transform your research.
Tracing your Irish ancestors: the complete guide  by John GrenhamTracing your Irish ancestors: the complete guide  
Grenham, John
Call Number: H 929.3415 G826 2012
2012
While maintaining his resource's foundation as part guidebook, part source list, and overall comprehensive guide to navigating records, repositories, and techniques on all aspects of Irish genealogy, Grenham (Irish Times Ancestors website) now better represents the proliferation of Irish genealogical resources available online. While the third edition referenced websites as just one element of an Irish family history project, this edition acknowledges them as a central feature of today's genealogical research, heavily incorporating websites (and tips for using them) in every chapter. The introduction has been expanded to include a guide on how to find and use key sites during various points of research, and a chapter dealing specifically with Internet research has been reworked with new and updated information. Individual chapters devoted to key record types such as census, vital, property, and church records and other important sources have been updated with frequent references to useful online resources.
The St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project: An Oral History of the Greatest Construction Show on Earth  by Claire  ParhamThe St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project: An Oral History of the Greatest Construction Show on Earth  
Parham, Claire
Call Number: H 627.137 P229
2009
This "oral" history of the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project uses interviews of the men who designed and built the Seaway to portray how it felt to be part of one of the largest and most successful construction projects of the 20th century. Parham (history, Siena College, NY) has included personal accounts from engineers, truck drivers, project managers, carpenters and local news reporters to comment on every possible topic from the economic relations between the US and Canada during the project to weekly casualty reports.
Mastering Online Genealogy by  Mastering Online Genealogy  
Call Number: H 929.10285 Q67
2012
This book teaches readers about the Internet as an effective genealogical research tool; genealogy databases: what they are, where they are, and how to use them; free genealogy websites: who they are, strengths and weaknesses; subscription services: who they are, what they cost, strengths and weaknesses of each; pitfalls to watch out for, pratfalls to avoid, the value of message boards, blogs, etc.; what kind of computer and software to buy. The author also includes genealogy software reviews and a glossary of terms.
Lost Eagles: One Man's Mission to Find Missing Airmen in Two World Wars  by Blaine  PardoeLost Eagles: One Man's Mission to Find Missing Airmen in Two World Wars  
Pardoe, Blaine
Call Number: H 940.48 P226
2010
Few people have ever heard of Frederick Zinn, yet even today airmen's families are touched by this man and the work he performed in both world wars. Zinn created the techniques still in use to determine the final fate of airmen missing in action. The last line of the Air Force Creed reads, "We will leave no airman behind." Zinn made that promise possible. Blaine Pardoe weaves together the complex story of a man who brought peace and closure to countless families who lost airmen during both world wars. His lasting contribution to warfare was a combination of his methodology for locating the remains of missing pilots (known as the Zinn system) and his innovation of imprinting all aircraft parts with the same serial number so that if a wreck was located, the crewman could be identified. The tradition he established for seeking and recovering airmen is carried on to this day.
Traverse City Postcard History  by Lawrence WakefieldTraverse City Postcard History  
Wakefield, Lawrence
Call Number: H 977.464 W147.1
1991
From the 1860's to the 1960's, this collection of postcards reveals the development and changes in Traverse City.
Abstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland  by V. L. SkinnerAbstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland  
Skinner, V. L.
Call Number: H 929.3752 S6285
2012
Volumes 35, 36, and 37 in this continuing series.
Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725  by David DobsonScots-Irish Links, 1575-1725  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.10
2010
Parts three through eight in a series compiled by Mr. Dobson to identify the Lowland Scots who migrated to Ulster between 1575 and 1725--many of whose progeny may have emigrated to America.
Later Scots-Irish links, 1725-1825  by David DobsonLater Scots-Irish links, 1725-1825  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.11
2006
In the tradition of his earlier volumes of Scots-Irish links for the period 1575 to 1725, Mr. Dobson has picked up the trails of Scots living in Ulster and of Irish living in Scotland during the following hundred years. The compiler has transcribed the identities of these individuals in a new series, Later Scots-Irish Links, 1725-1825. Working from primary sources in Scotland, such as university records, court records, gravestone inscriptions, family and estate records, as well as various published sources.
Huguenot and Scots Links 1575-1775  by Robert  BarnesHuguenot and Scots Links 1575-1775  
Barnes, Robert
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.12
2008
Working from baptismal registers, burgess rolls, tax lists, marriage registers, and other primary sources, Mr. Dobson has unearthed information concerning over 1,000 Scottish Huguenots or their descendants. For each individual, the compiler provides the name, a locale, a date, usually an occupation, and something about the person (e.g., "admitted as a burgess," or "apprenticed to James Smart a merchant in Edinburgh," or "married Beatrix Cowan in Canongate").
Colonial Families of Maryland: Bound and Determined to Succeed  by Robert  BarnesColonial Families of Maryland: Bound and Determined to Succeed  
Barnes, Robert
Call Number: H 929.3752 B261.5
2007
The main purpose of this work is to chronicle and categorize the life experiences of 519 persons who entered Maryland as indentured servants or, to a lesser extent, as convicts forcibly transported. The text itself is composed of solidly researched sketches of Maryland servants and convicts and their descendants, including 84 that are traced to the third generation or beyond.
Early Virginia Families Along the James River: Their Deep Roots and Tangled Branches  by Louise  FoleyEarly Virginia Families Along the James River: Their Deep Roots and Tangled Branches  
Foley, Louise
Call Number: H 929.3755 F6637
2002
This series is designed to identify the earliest settlers of Virginia. The purpose is to assist the researcher in finding colonial and immigrant ancestors in James City County, Henrico County, and Charles City County and in placing these early settlers in the milieu of their land patents. To accomplish this, Mrs. Foley abstracted the land records from the fourteen volumes of Patent Books for the period 1623-1732 which are now located in the Virginia State Archives in Richmond. The main body of the text consists of a chronological series of abstracts giving the name of the patentee as one of these counties, the location and acreage of the patent and date of settlement, with references to family members and owners of adjoining properties, and, most important, the names of the thousands of settlers brought over as "headrights." 
Swiss and German Pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania by H. Frank EshelmanSwiss and German Pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania  
Eshelman, H. Frank
Call Number: H 929.3748 E755
2006
Historic background and annals of the Swiss and German pioneer settlers of southeastern Pennsylvania, and of their remote ancestors, from the middle of the Dark Ages, down to the time of the Revolutionary War.
Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont by Hiram CarletonGenealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont  
Carleton, Hiram
Call Number: H 929.3743 C281
2010
A record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation.
Basic Guide to Irish Records for Family History  by Brian MitchellBasic Guide to Irish Records for Family History  
Mitchell, Brian
Call Number: H 929.3415 M6812.1
2008
According to the author, Irish genealogical records fall into the following eight major categories: (1) civil registers of births, marriages, and deaths, (2) church registers of baptisms, marriages, and burials, (3) gravestone inscriptions, (4) wills, (5) 1901 and 1911 census returns, (6) mid-19th-century Griffith's Valuation, (7) early 19th-century Tithe Applotment Books, and (8) other census substitutes. Mr. Mitchell examines each of these sources in detail, explaining what information they contain (often with facsimile reproductions of sample documents), where the originals/copies can be found, how to use them, and whether or not they can be accessed remotely via the Internet.
Pathways to Freeways: A History of Warren, Michigan by Warren Historical and Genealogical Society Pathways to Freeways: A History of Warren, Michigan  
Call Number: H 977.439 P2979
2011
The book begins with the geological formation of the land and traces the settlement and development of what became of the City of Warren. The work includes sections on the Historical Village, leaders of the township and city, a listing of cemeteries, churches, the Warren Library system, the development of the Water Treatment Plant, a description of the preservation groups that gather historical artifacts and information and a number of photos contributed by area residents and from the collection of the Society.
The People of Ireland, 1600-1699  by David DobsonThe People of Ireland, 1600-1699  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3415 D635.2
2007
This source book can be used to identify the locations where particular surnames or families can be found during the seventeenth century. The aim is to provide information on ordinary people throughout Ireland.
2

June 2012

The fur trade  by Rachel  JuenThe fur trade  
Juen, Rachel
Call Number: H 977.411 J933
2012
Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Booklet Series.
Genealogist's Handbook for New England Research  by Michael  LeclercGenealogist's Handbook for New England Research  
Leclerc, Michael
Call Number: H 929.374 G3262
2012
Updated 5th edition.
Geology and Landscape of Michigan's Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and Vicinity by  Geology and Landscape of Michigan's Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and Vicinity  
Call Number: H 557.74 B6478
2012
Located between Munising and Grand Marais on Lake Superior, Michigan's Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is anchored by the Pictured Rocks cliffs - soaring sandstone fortresses awash with natural pink, green, and brown pigments. While the Pictured Rocks' geologic history is generally well understood by scientists, much of this information is scattered among different sources and not easily accessible to general readers. In Geology and Landscape of Michigan's Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and Vicinity, William L. Blewett synthesizes published and unpublished information on the park's geologic history and combines it with vivid color photographs, detailed maps, and diagrams of the area.
Historic Photos of Detroit  by Mary  WallaceHistoric Photos of Detroit  
Wallace, Mary
Call Number: H 977.434 W192
2007
From the Underground Railroad to the Model T, the Cultural Center to Motown, Historic Photos of Detroit is a photographic history collected from the areas top archives. With around 200 photographs, many of which have never been published, this beautiful book shows the historical growth from the mid 1800's to the late 1900's of "the Motor City" in stunning black and white photography. The book follows life, government, events and people important to Detroit and the building of this unique city. Spanning over two centuries and two hundred photographs, this is a must have for any long-time resident or history lover of Detroit!
Women of New France  by Western Michigan University Women of New France  
Call Number: H 977.411 W87252
2010
Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project Booklet Series .
The Golden Dream: A History of the St. Lawrence Seaway  by Ronald  StaggThe Golden Dream: A History of the St. Lawrence Seaway  
Stagg, Ronald
Call Number: H 386.5 S7799
2010
This popular history chronicles the rise of one of the great engineering projects in Canadian history and its controversial impact on the people living along the St. Lawrence River.
Faith in Paper: The Ethnohistory and Litigation of Upper Great Lakes Indian Treaties by Charles  ClelandFaith in Paper: The Ethnohistory and Litigation of Upper Great Lakes Indian Treaties  
Cleland, Charles
Call Number: H 346.0434 C6247
2011
In addition to discussing the historic development of Indian treaties and their social and legal context, Charles E. Cleland outlines specific treaties litigated in modern courts as well as the impact of treaty litigation on the modern Indian and non-Indian communities of the region.
Imagining the Forest: Narratives of Michigan and the Upper Midwest  by John  KnottImagining the Forest: Narratives of Michigan and the Upper Midwest  
Knott, John
Call Number: H 634.9 K729
2012
Author John Knott draws upon such works as Simon Schama's Landscape and Memory and Robert Pogue Harrison's Forests: The Shadow of Civilization in exploring ways in which our relationships with forests have been shaped, using Michigan - its history of settlement, popular literature, and forest management controversies - as an exemplary case. Knott looks at such well-known figures as William Bradford, James Fenimore Cooper, John Muir, John Burroughs, and Teddy Roosevelt; Ojibwa conceptions of the forest and natural world (including how Longfellow mythologized them); early explorer accounts; and contemporary literature set in the Upper Peninsula, including Jim Harrison's True Northand Philip Caputo'sIndian Country. 
The Sixty Years' War for the Great Lakes, 1754-1814 by David  SkaggsThe Sixty Years' War for the Great Lakes, 1754-1814  
Skaggs, David
Call Number: H 977 S6255
2001
This book contains twenty essays concerning not only military and naval operations, but also the political, economic, social, and cultural interactions of individuals and groups during the struggle to control the great freshwater lakes and rivers between the Ohio Valley and the Canadian Shield.
Researching Your Irish Ancestors at Home and Abroad by David  ElliottResearching Your Irish Ancestors at Home and Abroad  
Elliott, David
Call Number: H 929.3415 H465
2012
An experienced genealogist and seasoned traveler, Elliott gives practical advice on finding relatives in Ireland. It also includes cultural analysis, archival research tips and an annotated bibliography in an illustrated guide.
Lake Superior Profiles: People on the Big Lake by John  GagnonLake Superior Profiles: People on the Big Lake  
Gagnon, John
Call Number: H 977.49 G1357
2012
This book combines biography, history, folklore, religion, and humor in fifteen diverse chapters. In Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Ontario, Gagnon visits the rivers, bays, small towns, larger cities, and nature preserves that surround Lake Superior to meet the people who make their homes there. Among those he meets are several fisherman, a botanist studying arctic wildflowers on Isle Royale, a former lighthouse keeper on a remote reef on the lake, a voyageur reenactor from Duluth, a woman who harvests wild rice each August in the Bad River Sloughs, and a monk living on the Keweenaw Peninsula. He also writes about three of the lake’s major fish species, a rock formation steeped in lore called the Sleeping Giant, and the current fragile ecology of the Big Lake. 
Remembering Flint, Michigan: Stories from the Vehicle City  by Gary FlinnRemembering Flint, Michigan: Stories from the Vehicle City  
Flinn, Gary
Call Number: H 977.437 F622
2010
Hop in for a ride with local history columnist Gary Flinn to the halcyon days of Flint. Revisit the contributions of oft-overlooked David Buick, the inventive and invaluable Flint auto pioneer who lacked the business savvy to become an auto legend. Travel back to the original Kewpee Burger and wash it down with an old Vernor's Ginger Ale before catching a show at Capitol Theatre. Fast-forward a few years and flip open a copy of the Flint Voice, the alternative newspaper published by controversial filmmaker and Flint native Michael Moore. Come along for the journey and time travel through Flint-the Vehicle City.
Sixty to Zero: An Inside Look at the Collapse of General Motors--and the Detroit Auto Industry by Alex TaylorSixty to Zero: An Inside Look at the Collapse of General Motors--and the Detroit Auto Industry  
Taylor, Alex
Call Number: H 338.7629222 G3267T
The collapse of General Motors captured headlines in early 2009, but as Alex Taylor III writes in this in-depth dissection of the automaker’s undoing, GM’s was a meltdown forty years in the making. Drawing on more than thirty years of experience and insight as an automotive industry reporter, as well as personal relationships with many of the leading players, Taylor reveals the many missteps of GM and its competitors.
Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City  by Greg GrandinFordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City  
Grandin, Greg
Call Number: H 981.15 G753
2009
The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon. 
Companions of Champlain: Founding Families of Quebec, 1608-1635  by Denise  LarsonCompanions of Champlain: Founding Families of Quebec, 1608-1635  
Larson, Denise
Call Number: H 929.3714 L3346
2009
The stories of the companions of Samuel de Champlain, the families who lived, worked, survived, and endured life at an isolated trading post in the strange New World-- these stories add flesh to the dry bones of the history of the seventeenth-century Age of Exploration.
Searching for Scotch-Irish Roots in Scottish Records, 1600-1750  by David DobsonSearching for Scotch-Irish Roots in Scottish Records, 1600-1750  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.9
2007
The aim of this groundbreaking book is to identify source material in Scottish libraries and archives that could enable people of Scotch-Irish (Scots-Irish) ancestry (i.e., the Ulster Scots) to locate their Scottish roots. Besides identifying the key records for making the leap from America or Ulster to Scotland, the author equips the researcher with a number of important tools for maximizing his/her efforts. These include a glossary and list of abbreviations, a list of family history societies in South-West Scotland, bibliographies of family histories and local histories concerned with South Western Scotland, and a general bibliography.
Soldiers of the Revolutionary War Buried in Vermont by Walter  CrockettSoldiers of the Revolutionary War Buried in Vermont  
Crockett, Walter
Call Number: H 973.3 C9389
2003
This unusual work lists the names of nearly 6,000 Revolutionary soldiers buried in Vermont, many of the soldiers having emigrated there from other states during the years immediately following the Revolution. The names were gathered from a variety of sources, but the largest number by far was extracted from a rare list of Vermont Revolutionary pensioners, a list embracing invalid pensioners, pensioners under the act of March 18, 1818, and pensioners under the act of June 7, 1832. Supplementing the lists is a section devoted to anecdotes and incidents of some of the Vermont soldiers in the various campaigns. The soldiers are listed alphabetically by county or town of interment.
Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725. Part One and Part Two  by David DobsonScots-Irish Links, 1575-1725. Part One and Part Two  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.10
2002
This is the fourth volume (fifth part) in a series compiled by Mr. Dobson to identify the Lowland Scots who migrated to Ulster between 1575 and 1725--many of whose progeny may have emigrated to America.
The Scottish Surnames of Colonial America  by David  DobsonThe Scottish Surnames of Colonial America  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.42 D635
2003
Finding one's forebears in Scotland can be a daunting task; therefore, researchers whose Scots ancestors came to colonial America must sometimes fall back on whatever clues are at hand. For example, knowledge of Scottish surnames can sometimes lead the genealogist to the clan from which his/her North American ancestor is descended. David Dobson has compiled a list of Scottish surnames of the estimated 150,000 Scots who settled in the America colonies. Many of the same surnames, of course, apply to the even greater number of Scots-Irish colonists whose forebears had originated in Scotland before re-settling in the province of Ulster.
2

May 2012

DNA and Social Networking: A Guide to Genealogy in the Twenty-first Century  by Debbie KennettDNA and Social Networking: A Guide to Genealogy in the Twenty-first Century  
Kennett, Debbie
Call Number: H 929.1 K365
2011
An easy-to-use guide to finding one's ancestors with the latest in new technology and scientific techniques—including blogs, web auctions, wikis, and YouTube.
Discover Your Family History Online: A Step-by-Step Guide to Starting Your Genealogy Search  by  Discover Your Family History Online: A Step-by-Step Guide to Starting Your Genealogy Search  
Call Number: H 929.1 H4984.1
2012
The internet has made millions of records available to search any time, anywhere. Start finding your ancestors with just a few strokes of a keyboard using the detailed instruction in this book.
The St. Joseph: Rivers of Michigan Series by Kit LaneThe St. Joseph: Rivers of Michigan Series  
Lane, Kit
Call Number: H 977.4 L2659.1
2010
The St. Joseph River starts at Lake Baw Beese in southeastern Michigan and moves westward. At about the 100 mile marker it dips suddenly south through the most heavily populated area in northern Indiana before veering northward and exiting into Lake Michigan at St. Joseph, Michigan. Once lined with mills and factories, today much of its banks are parkland and walking trails. Canoeists and kayakers have joined the fishermen on the river. There is even a whitewater course. The story is told with many maps, old postcards, and a mile by mile survey of what you will find on the river. 
Three Fires Unity: The Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron Borderlands  by Phil BellfyThree Fires Unity: The Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron Borderlands  
Bellfy, Phil
Call Number: H 977.00497 B442
2011
Winner of the North American Indian Prose Award, this first comprehensive cross-border history of the Anishnaabeg provides an engaging account of four hundred years of their life in the Lake Huron area, showing how they have been affected by European contact and trade.Three Fires Unity examines how shifting European politics and, later, the imposition of the Canada–United States border running through their homeland, affected them and continues to do so today. In looking at the cultural, social, and political aspects of this borderland contact, Phil Bellfy sheds light on how the Anishnaabeg were able to survive and even thrive over the centuries in this intensely contested region.
Roots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People  by Susan BellerRoots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People  
Beller, Susan
Call Number: H 929.1 B442
2007
An introduction to genealogy with instructions on how to use sources at home and do research at local, state, and national levels.
Maryland and Virginia Convict Runaways, 1725-1800: A Survey of English Sources by Peter ColdhamMaryland and Virginia Convict Runaways, 1725-1800: A Survey of English Sources  
Coldham, Peter
Call Number: H 929.3752 C688.1
2012
Based on newspaper advertisements placed in the Virginia Gazette and the Maryland Gazette this fascinating account of over 1,000 runaway convicts contains personal information not likely to be found in any other record, and includes colorful descriptions of the runaways themselves and details of their original offenses. Information furnished in the advertisements was meant to identify the runaway so he could be apprehended and returned, and it runs the gamut from physical descriptions to assessments of personal behavior.
Becoming Wilderness: Nature, History, and the Making of Isle Royale National Park  by Amalia BaldwinBecoming Wilderness: Nature, History, and the Making of Isle Royale National Park  
Baldwin, Amalia
Call Number: H 977.4997 B1811
2011
Becoming Wilderness explores the little-known backstory of Isle Royale's twenty-year journey from a largely unknown island in Lake Superior to the nation's first wilderness national park. Author Amalia Baldwin reveals the complex interplay of people, politics, and the evolving concept of wilderness behind the simple story that has been told of the park's formation.
Some Early Scots in Maritime Canada by Terrence PunchSome Early Scots in Maritime Canada  
Punch, Terrence
Call Number: H 929.3411 P9842
2011
Based on materials found in the Nova Scotia Archives and the Public Archives of New Brunswick, among others, Terrence Punch, who has compiled four volumes of similar data on Irish immigrants to Atlantic Canada, here presents the first volume of a series devoted to Scottish immigrants. In records ranging from newspaper announcements of marriages and deaths to cemetery records and censuses, and from rare passenger lists to probate records, this initial volume is a unique collection of fugitive records on Scottish immigrants to the Maritime Provinces, naming several thousand people who might otherwise go undetected in family annals. Thus, there are chapters on Scots in local histories, Scots deserters from ships, Sydney County and Cape Breton census records, newspaper records of Scots marriages and deaths to 1843, and much, much more, including maps and indexes of ships and surnames.
Our Founding Photographers: A Look at the History of Photography in Muskegon County, Michigan  by William  HansenOur Founding Photographers: A Look at the History of Photography in Muskegon County, Michigan  
Hansen, William
Call Number: H 977.457 H2499
2011
Pulled from the records of the local newspapers, this book looks at the reports of lives and professions of photographers from 1860's to the early 1920's in Muskegon County Michigan. Using articles and ads, we can read about the men and women who were the local photographic pioneer's and the trial and tribulations they encountered while in the trade. In addition to the articles and ads, a collection of photographs from the author's collection, taken by many of these photographers is included, along with maps from 1910 showing the location of several of the photo studios that were in operation.
From Home to Trench by Henry EwingFrom Home to Trench  
Ewing, Henry
Call Number: H 973.7 E954
2011
The Civil War Letters of Mack and Nan Ewing: 1856-1865.
Irish Pedigrees  by John  O'HartIrish Pedigrees  
O'Hart, John
Call Number: H 929.3415 O369
2011
This work is the magnum opus of Irish genealogy, a vast and prodigious compendium of family history and source material. The old Irish genealogies assembled here are brought down to the lineal descendant of each family living at the time of the British dispossession, although many of the descents are brought down to the 19th century. Also included is a lengthy appendix with an extraordinarily detailed table showing families that owned land in the 12th century. In addition, there is an index of several thousand surnames.
Batting a Thousand: A Portrait of Anna Whitten, Kalamazoo's Kindhearted Angel  by Michael LozonBatting a Thousand: A Portrait of Anna Whitten, Kalamazoo's Kindhearted Angel  
Lozon, Michael
Call Number: H 921 W6247L
2012
The story of one of Kalamazoo's busiest public-service volunteers.
A Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut  by R. HinmanA Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut  
Hinman, R.
Call Number: H 929.3746 H6637
2011
The standard dictionary of the "First Settlers" of Connecticut, this work consists of an alphabetically arranged list of about 2,000 persons, showing the time of their arrival, residence, station or occupation, and names of wives and children. Includes alphabetical lists of the first settlers of Enfield, Hartford, Saybrook, Wetherfield, and Windsor; a list of "A Part of the Early Marriages, Births, and Baptisms, in Hartford, Ct. from Record," and "Passengers of the Mayflower in 1620."
Some Pennsylvania Women During the War of the Revolution by William  EgleSome Pennsylvania Women During the War of the Revolution  
Egle, William
Call Number: H 974.8 E311
1993
In an effort to enshrine the heroic efforts of those women living outside the city of Philadelphia who helped sustain Washington's army at Valley Forge, Dr. Egle prepared genealogical and biographical sketches of the 69 Pennsylvania heroines of the Revolution and their spouses.
Slaves Soldiers Citizens: African Americans in Northwest Ottawa County  by Wallace EwingSlaves Soldiers Citizens: African Americans in Northwest Ottawa County  
Ewing, Wallace
Call Number: H 977.415 E958.1
2011
"This is the story of the many African Americans who settled in Northwest Ottawa County, some as early as 1845. Many of them established homes and worked in the Tri-Cities of Grand Haven, Ferrysburg, and Spring Lake, as well as the surrounding townships from the early years of settlement to recent times. A few passed through quickly, but still left their mark, while others came and departed leaving little more than a trace." - Wallace K. Ewing, Ph.D.
Jacobites of Lowland Scotland, England, Ireland, France, and Spain, 1745 by Frances  McDonnellJacobites of Lowland Scotland, England, Ireland, France, and Spain, 1745  
McDonnell, Frances
Call Number: H 929.341 M4788
2000
In the preparation of this volume Mrs. McDonnell examined records in the Scottish Record Office, National Archives of Scotland, and the Scottish History Society, as well as the Public Record Office in London. The end result of her labors is the alphabetical register of 1,500 Lowland, English, Irish, French, and a handful of Spanish Jacobites assembled for this volume. In the overwhelming number of cases, the descriptions state the Jacobite's name, rank, and date(s) of service and unit (if military), and, frequently, the subject's date and place of imprisonment, date and place of transportation, name of his vessel, and the place of arrival in the Americas.
Revolutionary War Pensions Awarded by State Governments 1775-1874, the General and Federal Governments Prior to 1814, and by Private Acts of Congress to 1905  by Lloyd BockstruckRevolutionary War Pensions Awarded by State Governments 1775-1874, the General and Federal Governments Prior to 1814, and by Private Acts of Congress to 1905  
Bockstruck, Lloyd
Call Number: H 973.3 B665.1
2011
This book brings together for the first time all the data from federal and state sources used to reconstruct Revolutionary War pension records. A long-sought goal of genealogists, this immense reconstruction was tackled skillfully here by Revolutionary War expert Lloyd Bockstruck. In the end we have an alphabetical list of over 16,000 pensioners with an index containing the names of a further 15,000 individuals mentioned in the text. Each entry contains the name of the pensioner, his state of service and place of residence, details of his service such as dates and places of engagements and wounds received, date of death, and names and relationships of surviving family members, especially widows.
The Beginner's Guide to Using Tax Lists  by Cornelius  CarrollThe Beginner's Guide to Using Tax Lists  
Carroll, Cornelius
Call Number: H 929.1 C3192
2012
A primer for making the best genealogical usage of tax lists. At the outset the author differentiates between tax lists, quit rents, tithables, militia lists, censuses, and similar records and the laws that applied to them. Then, by focusing on the tax lists of Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee, he demonstrates how tax lists can be used for determining parentage, birth and death dates, indentured servitude, slavery, manumission, and racial status. They can be used, in conjunction with other records, to help determine the parentage of a female, the date of a marriage, migration routes, and the accuracy of family traditions.
Indiantown: An Ojibwe Village Becomes a Farm Community  by Roselynn  EdererIndiantown: An Ojibwe Village Becomes a Farm Community  
Ederer, Roselynn
Call Number: H 977.446 E22.9
2011
This Indiantown book is a history of two cultures, the Native Americans who lived here first and the German immigrants who followed them. As you journey into Indiantown's past and present societies, you will learn how its residents were an important part of Saginaw's interesting history and the significant role they played in developing Michigan's agricultural industry.--Introd.
2

April 2012

Female Index to Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England  by James SavageFemale Index to Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England  
Savage, James
Call Number: H 929.374 S26G
2008
While James Savage's Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, first published in 1860, may be "one of the greatest works ever published on New England genealogy," females were difficult to locate because some were listed under fathers' names while others were listed under husbands' names. This index addresses that problem by listing all the females alphabetically by maiden name and all married names.
Thrift Store Graces: Finding God's Gifts in the Midst of the Mess by Jane KnuthThrift Store Graces: Finding God's Gifts in the Midst of the Mess  
Knuth, Jane
Call Number: H 267.182 K748
2012
This “ridiculous” religious thinking - that when we help the poor, they end up helping us - is at the heart of the 30 stories that Jane Knuth shares in Thrift Store Graces, the sequel to her popular Thrift Store Saints. Similar to the first book,Thrift Store Graces contains personal accounts of Knuth’s experiences serving as a once reluctant, now enthusiastic volunteer at a thrift store in Kalamazoo, Michigan.
Scottish Soldiers in Colonial America  by David DobsonScottish Soldiers in Colonial America  
Dobson, David
Call Number: H 929.3411 D635.8
1997
Scottish emigration authority David Dobson identified over a thousand Scottish solders in colonial America. The list of soldiers is arranged alphabetically and, while the descriptions vary widely, the researcher will discover some or all of the following information in each one: soldier's name, rank, military unit, date(s) and campaign(s) of service, place of birth, when arrived in North America, civilian occupation, date and place of death, and the source of the information. Because the Highlanders found here offer potential links between the New and Old Worlds, this ground-breaking book will be welcomed by all students of Scottish genealogy.
New York Alien Residents, 1825-1848  by Kenneth ScottNew York Alien Residents, 1825-1848  
Scott, Kenneth
Call Number: H 929.3747 S427.2
1998
Until 1825 an alien resident of New York could neither hold nor bequeath property, but by an Act of the State Legislature, April 21, 1825, he was permitted to hold real property provided he deposed that he was a resident of the U.S. and intended to become a naturalized citizen. These alien depositions, which were filed in the office of the Secretary of State of New York, for the years 1825-1848, provide some or all of the following pieces of information: the alien's place of residence, regularly by county and often by village, town, or city, is stated; country of birth, sometimes with name of county or department, is often given; date of birth, the age when the alien arrived in the U.S., or when he deposed, is occasionally recorded; date of arrival may be found; and status of a woman (single, married, or widowed) is usually set forth, as is the name of a husband, with his trade or profession.
Abstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland  by V.  SkinnerAbstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland  
Skinner, V.
Call Number: H 929.3752 S6285
2012
Continuing series - new volumes 31-34.
Everyday Klansfolk: White Protestant Life and the KKK in 1920s Michigan by Craig FoxEveryday Klansfolk: White Protestant Life and the KKK in 1920s Michigan  
Fox, Craig
Call Number: H 322.42 F7914
2011
In 1920s Middle America, the Ku Klux Klan gained popularity not by appealing to the fanatical fringes of society, but by attracting the interest of “average” citizens. During this period, the Klan recruited members through the same unexceptional channels as any other organization or club, becoming for many a respectable public presence, a vehicle for civic activism, or the source of varied social interaction. Its diverse membership included men and women of all ages, occupations, and socio-economic standings. Although surviving membership records of this clandestine organization have proved incredibly rare, Everyday Klansfolk uses newly available documents to reconstruct the life and social context of a single grassroots unit in Newaygo County, Michigan. A fascinating glimpse behind the mask of America’s most notorious secret order, this absorbing study sheds light on KKK activity and membership in Newaygo County, and in Michigan at large, during the brief and remarkable peak years of its mass popular appeal. 
Profiles of Michigan  by  Profiles of Michigan  
Call Number: H 977.4 P96446
2012
History, statistics, demographies for all 2,026 populated places in Michigan.
Superior, a State for the North Country  by John  O'HartSuperior, a State for the North Country  
O'Hart, John
Call Number: H 977.49 C3238
2011
The story of efforts by the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and Northeastern Wisconsin to form a separate state.
"Second Census" of Kentucky 1800  
Clift, G.
Call Number: H 312 KEN 1800
2005
A privately compiled and published enumeration of tax payers appearing in the 79 manuscript volumes extant of tax lists of the 42 counties of Kentucky in existence in 1800.
Answering the Call to Duty: Saving Custer, Heroism at Gettysburg, POWs and Other Stories of Michigan's Small Town Soldiers in the Civil War by Rick LiblongAnswering the Call to Duty: Saving Custer, Heroism at Gettysburg, POWs and Other Stories of Michigan's Small Town Soldiers in the Civil War  
Liblong, Rick
Call Number: H 973.7 L6959
2011
Profiles men from Almont, Michigan and surrounding towns in Lapeer County, Michigan who answered the "Call to Duty" to preserve the Union during the Civil War.
Belgians in Michigan  by Bernard CookBelgians in Michigan  
Cook, Bernard
Call Number: H 977.4004 C7711
2007
At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Michigan was home to the second-largest Belgian population in the United States, and Detroit had one of the largest Belgian populations in the nation. Although immigration declined after World War I, the Belgian-American community is still prominent in the state. Political, religious, and economic conditions, including a nineteenth- century economic depression, helped motivate the move to America. Belgians brought with them the ability and willingness to innovate, as well as a tradition of hard work and devotion. TheGazette van Detroit, a Flemish-language newspaper first printed in Detroit in 1914, continues to be produced and distributed to subscribers throughout the United States and overseas. Belgian-Americans continue to incorporate traditional values with newfound American values, enabling them to forever preserve their heritage.
Grand Trunk Corporation: Canadian National Railways in the United States, 1971-1992 by Donovan HofsommerGrand Trunk Corporation: Canadian National Railways in the United States, 1971-1992  
Hofsommer, Donovan
Call Number: H 385 H7137
1995
The Detroit, Michigan-based Grand Trunk Corporation was established more than two decades ago by Canadian National to oversee and maximize the potential of its railroad holdings in the United States. By making use of corporate records, oral histories, and archival material, Hofsommer uncovers the interesting and complex history of Grand Trunk from its inception in 1971 through 1992.
Iron Will: Cleveland-Cliffs and the Mining of Iron Ore, 1847-2006  by Terry ReynoldsIron Will: Cleveland-Cliffs and the Mining of Iron Ore, 1847-2006  
Reynolds, Terry
Call Number: H 338.7622 R465
2011
This institutional history of Cliffs Natural Resources, America's sole remaining independent iron producer, documents the contributions of this mining corporation and its leaders to the nation's industrial past and future. Beginning with the company's founding in the 1850s, the work examines the firm's role in developing the mining potential of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, its struggles in the Great Depression, the boom years of the World War II era, and the consolidations and acquisitions that would allow the company to weather the de-industrialization of the late twentieth century and prosper. The volume includes numerous black and white photos and maps.
2

March 2012

Michigan's Economic Future: A New Look  by Charles BallardMichigan's Economic Future: A New Look  
Ballard, Charles
Call Number: H 330.9774 B1892
2010
This accessible, engaging text examines the impact of the trends that have shaped Michigan’s economy, and offers innovative solutions to the current economic crisis. Charles Ballard’s illuminating book explores the structure of Michigan’s economy, including its roots in agriculture, the rise and fall of the automotive industry, and the long-term decline of manufacturing.
29 Missing: The True and Tragic Story of the Disappearance of the S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald  by Andrew Kantar29 Missing: The True and Tragic Story of the Disappearance of the S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald  
Kantar, Andrew
Call Number: H 977.49 K1679
1998
On November 10, 1975, SS Edmund Fitzgerald, a giant freighter, sank with its entire crew of 29 aboard, in one of the most violent storms ever witnessed on Lake Superior. In29 Missing, Kantar tells the "Fitz's" story from the christening in 1958 as the largest ship on the Great Lakes to the expedition in 1995 to recover the ship's bell in what proved to be a moving memorial to the lost crew. Using information from government investigative reports, the book provides a dramatic hour-by-hour account of what transpired during that terrible voyage, including dialogue from actual radio transmissions between the Fitzgerald and the Arthur Anderson, the freighter that followed behind the Fitz.In his passionate retelling of the story, designed primarily for young adults, Kantar provides the facts leading up to the disappearance, detailing the subsequent expeditions to the wreck site as well as the leading theories about the sinking that have been debated by maritime experts.
Latinos in the Midwest by Ruben  MartinezLatinos in the Midwest  
Martinez, Ruben
Call Number: H 977.00468 L3579
2011
The 11 essays of this collection provide an up-to-date overview of the lives of Latinos in the American Midwest, with attention to the impact they experience from various official agencies such as immigration, healthcare, and law enforcement. Using nationwide and local studies, the chapters interpret and analyze statistics and findings concerning demographics throughout the region to demonstrate key issues such as employment, financial and physical well-being, and useful and accessible education. Individual case studies are described at length in some of the essays, giving the reader an insight into the realities of daily life.
After Tippecanoe: Some Aspects of the War of 1812  by Philip MasonAfter Tippecanoe: Some Aspects of the War of 1812  
Mason, Philip
Call Number: H 973.52 A2589
2011
Though the Shawnee chief Tecumseh attempted to form a confederacy of tribes to stem the tide of white settlement in the Old Northwest, in November of 1811, the Americans marched to his village at the mouth of Tippecanoe Creek. The ensuing battle ended all hope of an Indian federation and had far-reaching effects on American and British relations. The British, blamed for providing the Indians with arms, drew the ire of hawks in Congress, who clamored ever more loudly for a war to end England’s power in North America. Revised with a new introduction and updated biographical information,After Tippecanoecontains six papers originally presented as lectures in Windsor, Canada, and Detroit, Michigan, during the winter of 1961–62 by three American and three Canadian historians. Their focus is the War of 1812 as it unfolded in the Great Lakes region, with special emphasis on the conflict in Michigan, New York, and Ontario, Canada.
Detroit: A Biography  by Scott MartelleDetroit: A Biography  
Martelle, Scott
Call Number: H 977.434 M376
2012
Detroit: A Biography takes a long, unflinching look at the evolution of one of America’s great cities, and one of the nation’s greatest urban failures. It tells how the city grew to become the heart of American industry and how its utter collapse—from 1.8 million residents in 1950 to 714,000 only six decades later—resulted from a confluence of public policies, private industry decisions, and deep, thick seams of racism. And it raises the question: when we look at modern-day Detroit, are we looking at the ghost of America’s industrial past or its future? 
Punching Out: One Year in a Closing Auto Plant  by Paul ClemensPunching Out: One Year in a Closing Auto Plant  
Clemens, Paul
Call Number: H 338.476292 C625
2011
How does a country dismantle a century’s worth of its industrial heritage? To answer that question, Paul Clemens investigates the 2006 closing of one of America’s most potent symbols: a Detroit auto plant. Prior to its closing, the Budd Company stamping plant on Detroit’s East Side, built in 1919, was one of the oldest active auto plants in America’s foremost industrial city-one whose history includes the nation’s proudest moments and those of its working class. Its closing also reflects the character of the country in a new era-the sad, brutal process of picking it apart and sending it, piece by piece, to the countries that now have use for its machines.
Unsolved Mysteries: The Shipwreck Thomas Hume: The Anatomy of an Archeological Investigation by Valerie  Van HeestUnsolved Mysteries: The Shipwreck Thomas Hume: The Anatomy of an Archeological Investigation  
Van Heest, Valerie
Call Number: H 977.4 P96446
2011
History, statistics, demographies for all 2,026 populated places in Michigan.
The Michigan History Directory: Historical Societies, Museums, Agencies and Commissions  by Historical Society of Michigan The Michigan History Directory: Historical Societies, Museums, Agencies and Commissions  
Call Number: H 929.1 M2851
2011
The Michigan History Directory of Historical Societies, Museums, Archives, Historic Sites, Agencies and Commissions provides an updated guide to Michigan’s historical resources including many new historical organizations that were not listed in previous editions.All entries feature detailed information on hundreds of Michigan historical societies, museums, archives, historic sites and other historical organizations making it a critical tool for anyone undertaking research in Michigan history.The Michigan History Directory is an important resource for individuals that do historical research, libraries, historical organizations, tourists and anyone interested in detailed information on Michigan’s historical resources.--From the publisher
The Unofficial Family Archivist: A Guide to Creating and Maintaining Family Papers, Photographs, and Memorabilia  by Melissa MannonThe Unofficial Family Archivist: A Guide to Creating and Maintaining Family Papers, Photographs, and Memorabilia  
Mannon, Melissa
Call Number: H 929.1 M2851
2011
This book focuses on the care of personal papers, photographs, and memorabilia found in the typical home. Written for individuals who hope to protect family history, this book provides everything an unofficial archivist needs to ensure materials that connect us with our past are available for future generations. Its goal is to help you create and maintain a valuable family and community resource of recorded information about your world from the unique point of view of you and your loved ones. The Unofficial Family Archivist is organized into eight sections that discuss preservation; creating and identifying materials that represent you; how to properly organize, preserve, and describe these items; how to prepare them to pass on to future generations. This book provides information to guide you so you may enjoy your materials, easily access them, feel comfortable that they will last for a long time and be treasured by your descendants.--From the cover.
Maltese in Michigan  by Joseph LubigMaltese in Michigan  
Lubig, Joseph
Call Number: H 977.4004 L929
2011
Lubig offers a history of the Maltese people in Michigan. He briefly describes the islands of Malta and their geography and history, then details early American colonies of the Maltese. He discusses immigration to Detroit prior to and after World War II, religious affiliation with Roman Catholicism, the struggle to become American yet maintain a Maltese identity, business success, and food. Recipes are included.
Lost Legends of the Lakes  by Robert McGreevyLost Legends of the Lakes  
McGreevy, Robert
Call Number: H 977 M4788
2011
A unique study of the maritime heritage of the Great Lakes from an artist's viewpoint.
Jacobson's: I Miss it so!: The Story of a Michigan Fashion Institution  by Bruce KopytekJacobson's: I Miss it so!: The Story of a Michigan Fashion Institution  
Kopytek, Bruce
Call Number: H 381.141 K839
2011
Join department store historian Bruce Allen Kopytek in this return to the elegance of Jacobson's, a beloved Michigan institution for well over one hundred years. Reenter the marvelous stores and meet the personalities who transformed Jacobson's from its humble Reed City origins to a staple of sophistication throughout the region and in Florida. The brainchild of a retail genius, this deluxe specialty store gave customers a peerless social, shopping and dining destination. Experience anew the refined beauty of its Williamsburg-style Grosse Pointe store, the chic designer world of its Birmingham ensemble or the charm and allure of its original Florida branch in Sarasota, revealing along the way secrets that made Jake's the dazzling store it was and why it remains so profoundly missed by anyone who entered through its solid wooden doors.
The United States Army in the War of 1812  by John FredriksenThe United States Army in the War of 1812  
Fredriksen, John
Call Number: H 973.52 F8529
2009
While the Revolutionary and Civil wars have been the object of much research and documentation, the war that bridged them has been comparatively neglected. This comprehensive research guide summarizes the careers of President and Commander-in-Chief James Madison, his three secretaries of war, nine major generals, and 27 brigadier generals, and traces the operations of various departments, five artillery regiments, three cavalry regiments, the Corps of Engineers, 48 infantry regiments, and four rifle regiments of the United States during the War of 1812. For each it provides a bibliography of primary and secondary sources and a listing of manuscripts and archival resources. A directory of more than 100 manuscript repositories and their addresses is included.
George Rickey: The Early Works  by Maxwell DavidsonGeorge Rickey: The Early Works  
Davidson, Maxwell
Call Number: H 730.92 R5397D
2004
George Rickey's fascinating sculptural oeuvre is incredibly diverse. This book is concerned exclusively with the early indoor sculptures from the first 25 years of Rickey's output. With over 380 color and black and white photos covering the artist's early innovations, we get an intimate and more complete picture of his artistic diversity than ever before.
2

February 2012

Iron Ore Transport on the Great Lakes: The Development of a Delivery System to Feed American Industry  by W. Bruce BowlusIron Ore Transport on the Great Lakes: The Development of a Delivery System to Feed American Industry  
Bowlus, W. Bruce
Call Number: H 386.544 B7874
2010
The availability of inexpensive steel, so crucial to the United States' emergence as a leading industrial power in the late nineteenth century, relied upon the rise of an ore transport system on the Great Lakes that would feed American industry as a whole and come to alter the face of the region. This detailed history recounts innovations in shipping, the improvement of channels and harbors, the creation of locks, technical advances in loading and unloading equipment, and the ability to attract capital and government support to fund the various projects. When government support was lacking, reinterpretations of the Constitution were introduced to justify federal involvement. These changes, which often functioned symbiotically, represent one of the key untold stories in the spectacular rise of American industry.
The War of 1812 in Person: Fifteen Accounts by United States Army Regulars, Volunteers and Militiamen  by John  FredriksenThe War of 1812 in Person: Fifteen Accounts by United States Army Regulars, Volunteers and Militiamen  
Fredriksen, John
2010
The diaries, memoirs, and letters have all been published before, but never together to provide a kaleidoscopic view of the first foreign war conducted by the newborn republic. The regular soldiers include officers and enlisted men from the infantry, artillery, and dragoons. The four volunteers served in the Kentucky Mounted Riflemen, the New Hampshire Volunteers, Fenton's Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the Pittsburgh Blues. The accounts tend to reinforce the popular and academic views that the war against Britain was not well planned or pursued.
Hank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to be One by Mark KurlanskyHank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to be One  
Kurlansky, Mark
Call Number: H 921 G79915K
2011
In Hank GreenbergMark Kurlansky explores the truth behind the slugger's legend: his Bronx boyhood, his spectacular discipline as an aspiring ballplayer, the complexity of his decision not to play on Yom Kippur, and the cultural context of virulent anti-Semitism in which his career played out.What Kurlansky discovers is a man of immense dignity and restraint with a passion for sport who became a great reader—a man, too, who was an inspiration to the young Jackie Robinson, who said, "Class tells. It sticks out all over Mr. Greenberg."
Spann's Guide to Gibson 1902-1941  by Joseph  SpannSpann's Guide to Gibson 1902-1941  
Spann, Joseph
Call Number: H 787.8719 S7358
2011
Centerstream presents this detailed look at the inner workings of the famous musical instrument manufacturer of Kalamazoo, Michigan before World War II. For the first time, Gibson fans can learn about the employees who built the instruments, exactly where the raw materials came from, the identity of parts vendors, and how the production was carried out. The book explains Gibson's pre-World War II factory order number and serial number systems, and corrects longstanding chronological errors. Previously unknown information about every aspect of the operation is covered in-depth. Noted historian Joe Spann gathered firsthand info from pre-war employees, and had access to major Gibson document collections around the world.
Twilight Rails: The Final Era of Railroad Building in the Midwest  by H. Roger GrantTwilight Rails: The Final Era of Railroad Building in the Midwest  
Grant, H. Roger
Call Number: H 385 G7621
2010
H. Roger Grant-one of the leading railroad historians working today-documents the stories of eight Midwestern carriers that appeared at the end of the railroad building craze. When historians have reflected on these “twilight” carriers, they have suggested that they were relevant only as examples of unwise business ventures. Grant finds that even the weakest railroads were important to the communities they served; the arrival of the railroad was cause for great celebration as residents were finally connected to the outside world. A railroad’s construction pumped money into local economies, farmers and manufacturers gained access to better markets, and the excitement generated by a new line often increased land values and inspired expansion of local businesses. Even the least financially successful carriers, Grant argues, managed to significantly improve their local economies. This thorough and highly accessible history provides a fascinating look at the motivations, accomplishments, and failures of the twilight carriers, granting a new breath of life to this neglected aspect of American railway history.
Derek Jeter: From the Pages of the New York Times by Richard SlovakDerek Jeter: From the Pages of the New York Times  
Slovak, Richard
Call Number: H 921 J587D
2011
This book is filled with entertaining stories, penetrating insights, and colorful voices: not only Jeter himself, but also George Steinbrenner, Joe Torre, Alex Rodriguez, and a host of players, past and present. In words and photographs, it covers Jeter's rise, his style of play, his best moments on (and off) the field, his character as a teammate and a leader, and his place in Yankee history.
Detroitland: A Collection of Movers, Shakers, Lost Souls, and History Makers from Detroit's Past  by Richard BakDetroitland: A Collection of Movers, Shakers, Lost Souls, and History Makers from Detroit's Past  
Bak, Richard
Call Number: H 977.434 B166.1
2011
Celebrating the glory days of the city, this collection offers feature-length historical articles by the author that have appeared in periodicals such as Detroit Monthly, Hour Detroit, Michigan History, and the Sunday magazine section of the Detroit News; most of the articles have been updated and expanded. Each chapter covers a personality, event, or era during 100 years of Detroit history, profiling human interest stories as well as politicians, criminals, sports figures, and Motown musicians.
Myths and Mysteries of Michigan: True Stories of the Unsolved and Unexplained  by Sally BarberMyths and Mysteries of Michigan: True Stories of the Unsolved and Unexplained  
Barber, Sally
Call Number: H 977.4 B2347
2012
This selection of 12-15 stories from Michigan's past explores some of the Great Lakes State's most compelling mysteries and debunks some of its most famous myths.--From the publisher
Scotland: Owners of Lands and Heritages by Angus FletcherScotland: Owners of Lands and Heritages  
Fletcher, Angus
Call Number: H 929.3411 S4243
2011
17 & 18 Vict. Cap. 91, 1872-1873 : return: I, Of the name and address of every owner of one acre and upwards in extent, outside the municipal boundaries of boroughs containing more than 20,000 inhabitants, with the estimated acreage, and the annual value of the lands and heritages of individual owners; and of the number of owners of less than one acre, with the estimated aggregate acreage and annual value of the lands and heritages of such owners in each county, II, A similar return for municipal boroughs containing more than 20,000 inhabitants, presented to both Houses of Parliament by command of Her Majesty Queen Victoria.
A Guide to Tracing Your Kerry Ancestors by Michael  O'ConnorA Guide to Tracing Your Kerry Ancestors  
O'Connor, Michael
Call Number: H 929.34196 O187
2011
Kerry is one of the Irish counties which has experienced a high level of emigration to North America and elsewhere. Common names in the county include O'Sullivan, O'Shea, Sheehan, O'Dohoghue or O'Donohoe, Cregan, O'Driscoll, Falvey, O'Connor, Moriarty, McCarthy, Kelleher or Kelliher, O'Connell, O'Mahoney, Fitzgerald, Cantillon, Stack, Hussey, Clifford and Fitzmaurice. In comparison with many Irish counties, it has fewer records of value to family historians. This makes it important to use the existing records to their best advantage.
2

January 2012

Put Up Your Hair:  Practical Manual to Nineteenth Century Hairstyles by Julie  BrownPut Up Your Hair: Practical Manual to Nineteenth Century Hairstyles  
Brown, Julie
Call Number: H 646.724 B8787
2010
A fascinating how-to hair styling manual for women who work at living history sites, actors or reenactors who want to create an accurate look for their chosen time period, or anyone interested in historical styles.--From the cover
Orphan Trains and Their Precious Cargo: The Life's Work of Rev. H.D. Clarke  by Herman ClarkeOrphan Trains and Their Precious Cargo: The Life's Work of Rev. H.D. Clarke  
Clarke, Herman
Call Number: H 362.73 C5983
2007
Rev. Clarke oversaw the transport and settlement of orphans from New York City to various communities in the mid-west beginning in 1900 when he was hired by the Children's Aid Society. This account is based on his diaries, and identifies many of the orphans, including the author's grandmother.
A Guide to Tracing Your Dublin Ancestors  by James  RyanA Guide to Tracing Your Dublin Ancestors  
Ryan, James
Call Number: H 929.34183 R9886
2009
This is the 3rd edition of this comprehensive guide to family history research in Dublin City and County. The new edition is totally updated and expanded, with new illustrations and material. It describes how to best use the records available, and where they can be accessed. For each type of record it provides background information on how they were compiled and what information was contained, and on which categories of people. It also provides background on the social history of Dublin and how this history has affected the keeping and survival of records.--From the publisher
The Best Genealogical Sources in Print by Gary  RobertsThe Best Genealogical Sources in Print  
Roberts, Gary
Call Number: H 929.374 R6443
2011
Roberts is an expert in notable families and master of printed resources, with an encyclopedic knowledge of genealogical sources. He has published many articles over the years discussing important genealogical sources and educating the family historian in the value of printed genealogical works, and this volume brings the best of them together into accessible form. This long awaited anthology, collecting and updating essays originally published between 1976 and 2004, is the culmination of Gary Boyd Roberts’ remarkable career in genealogy. Experienced genealogists and those newer to the field alike will hone the skills required to correct and expand their research. For those who work largely from Internet sources, and frequently find them to be in error, the sources discussed in this book can be invaluable to raising the scholarship of your own family history project.--From the publisher
A Guide to Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors  by Brian SmithA Guide to Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors  
Smith, Brian
Call Number: H 929.34173 S6437
2010
In comparison with most other Irish counties, Mayo has fewer records of value to family historians. This makes it important to use the existing records to their best advantage. The main Mayo families include Walsh, Gallagher, Kelly, O'Malley, Moran, MacHale, Gibbons, Joyce, Connor, Conway, Higgins, Murphy, Burke, Bourke, Reilly or Riley, Durkan or Durkin, Doherty, McHugh, MacHugh, Sweeney, Sweeny and Lyons. This book sets out the records available, where they can be accessed, and how they can be used to best effect in tracing Mayo families.--From the publisher
A Guide to Tracing Your Cork Ancestors  by Tony McCarthyA Guide to Tracing Your Cork Ancestors  
McCarthy, Tony
Call Number: H 929.34195 M4788
2011
Cork is the largest Irish county, with a population mainly of Gaelic and Norman origin. It has a widely diverse social mix ranging from the urban population of Cork city to the most remote agricultural communities. Common names in the county include Barry, Callahan, O'Callaghan, Buckley, Boyle, Casey, Collins,Crowley, Daly, Fitzgerald, Hogan, Keane, Kelliher, O'Connell, O'Keefe, O'Leary, O'Mahony, O'Driscoll, O'Riordan and Sheehan. The records for the county are equally diverse, which makes it important to use them to their best advantage. This new and expanded edition sets out the records available, where they can be accessed, and how they can be used to best effect.--From the publisher
New Copies of Old Records from Hebron, Connecticut 1708-1875  by Linda MacLachlanNew Copies of Old Records from Hebron, Connecticut 1708-1875  
MacLachlan, Linda
Call Number: H 929.374643 M1611
2011
This book augments the Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Records for Hebron with transcriptions of two documents, extraction of a third, and analysis of a fourth. Part I contains a transcript of town death records, 1796–1860, not filmed by any library or indexed by Barbour; and the transcript of an 1886 manuscript by Will J. Warner, which includes all the early Gilead Church records and other historical material. Part II presents births, marriages and deaths, 1847–1870, extracted from an unrecognized volume of vital records in the Hebron town clerk’s office. These vital statistics expand Barbour’s collection for Hebron through 1854. Part III examines the methodology for completing the Barbour Index and provides additions and corrections to the index. Researchers will appreciate the every-name index that completes this work.
Waifs, Foundlings and Half-Orphans: Searching for America's Orphan Train Riders  by Mary  JohnsonWaifs, Foundlings and Half-Orphans: Searching for America's Orphan Train Riders  
Johnson, Mary
Call Number: H 362.73 J682
2007
During the Orphan Trains Era, 1854 until 1929, an estimated 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, or homeless children and families were relocated from major metropolitan east coast cities to new homes in the west traveling aboard trains. Children relocated via these trains were called Riders. In the early 1850s, the term orphan referred to children living without adult supervision. Some of these homeless children were actual orphans, while others were half-orphans with one parent living but unable to care for the child. A fair number of these street children were turned out to fend for themselves as the result of extreme poverty. This slender volume helps preserve the life experiences of the Riders-information that has impacted foster children today. The traumatic early lives of the Riders demonstrated the need of siblings to keep in touch if they must be separated and the positive affect that work has on self-esteem. Two moving first-hand accounts precede an examination of the impact of mass migration, followed by a discussion of orphanages and institutions, a helpful section on research and resources, and finally, references and a reading list. A full name index adds to the value of this work. 
A Guide to Tracing Your Limerick Ancestors  by Margaret FranklinA Guide to Tracing Your Limerick Ancestors  
Franklin, Margaret
Call Number: H 929.34194 F833
2003
Margaret Franklin is the local history specialist in Limerick County Library. She has compiled a comprehensive guide to tracing families in the City and County of Limerick. The most commmon family names in Limerick include O'Brien, Ryan, O'Donovan, O'Sheehan, O'Hurley, O'Gorman, O'Scanlan, Fitzgerald, Wall, Fitzgibbon, Harold, de Lacy and Woulfe. The book is filled with information on what the records contain, and how and where they can be accessed. It is well illustrated with maps, examples of the records to be found; and other relevant material. There is also a comprehensive index.
A Guide to Tracing Your Roscommon Ancestors  by  A Guide to Tracing Your Roscommon Ancestors  
Call Number: H 929.34175 H2327
2007
A comprehensive guide to tracing families in Roscommon, where common names include Kelly, McDermot, Beirne, Regan Reagan, Flanagan, Connor, McDonagh & Quinn. It is filled with information on what the records contain, and how and where they can be accessed. It is well illustrated with maps and examples of the types of records to be found. It has an extensive listing of references to estate records, and family histories. There is a full index.
A Guide to Tracing Your Donegal Ancestors  by  A Guide to Tracing Your Donegal Ancestors  
Call Number: H 929.341693 M4943
2008
In comparison with most other Irish counties, Donegal has fewer records of value to family historians. This makes it important to use the existing records to their best advantage. Donegal families are a mixture of native Gaelic families, and of Scots-Irish families who came to Donegal from the 17th century onward. Common names in the county include O'Neill, O'Donnell, Bonner, Barr, Bradley, Duffy, Friel, Gormley, O'Kane, Gallagher, Harkin, McBride, McCafferty, McDaid, Patton, Morrissey, Ward and Sweeney. It is also one of the counties which experienced a high level of emigration to North America and elsewhere. This book sets out the records available for Donegal, where they can be accessed, and how they can be used to best effect in tracing Donegal families.
The War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites  by John GrantThe War of 1812: A Guide to Battlefields and Historic Sites  
Grant, John
Call Number: H 973.52 G7623
2011
Lushly illustrated with more than 120 color photographs and archival paintings, this exciting documentary companion brings the war to life with vivid descriptions and insightful eyewitness accounts. Readers can relive key moments in the conflict by visiting battlefields and other relevant sites such as Queenstown Heights, Lundy's Lane, Fort McHenry,and Chalmette Plantation outside New Orleans. The book is divided into seven chronologically arranged chapters, each of them focusing on one of several distinct theaters of the war. Follow the course of what happened and why each location was important to the war as a whole.
Directory of Photographers in the United States 1888 & 1889 and Canada 1889  by Diane  GagelDirectory of Photographers in the United States 1888 & 1889 and Canada 1889  
Gagel, Diane
Call Number: H 770.922 G133
2010
This Directory was taken from the First and Second Annual Editions of the Lithographers and Photographers Directory: A Directory for Lithographers, Photographers and for all allied Arts and Trades in the United States and Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, published in 1888 and 1889. In the original format entries were arranged by country, state and city. Ms. Gagel has included a copy of this format in this publication.
Slave Ancestral Research: It's Something Else  by Mary L.  FearsSlave Ancestral Research: It's Something Else  
Fears, Mary L.
Call Number: H 929.2 M4788F
2007
This book contains over one hundred documents which illustrate how the author found the names of her slave ancestors and the surnames of the slave owners. Slave lists are included from four Georgia counties: Warren, Baldwin, Talbot, and Taylor.
It Happened in Michigan: Remarkable Events that Shaped History  by Colleen BurcarIt Happened in Michigan: Remarkable Events that Shaped History  
Burcar, Colleen
Call Number: H 977.4 B9471
This book offers an inside look at over 25 interesting and unusual episodes that shaped the history of the Great Lakes State.
Early New Brunswick Canada Probate Records, 1785-1835 by R. W. HaleEarly New Brunswick Canada Probate Records, 1785-1835  
Hale, R. W.
Call Number: H 929.37151 H163
2007
Detailed abstracts of all the extant probate records of New Brunswick. Gives residences, occupations, relationships, etc.
A Pre-Primer for Beginners in Genealogical Search: What to Read Before Your First How-To Book by Sophie  FisherA Pre-Primer for Beginners in Genealogical Search: What to Read Before Your First How-To Book  
Fisher, Sophie
Call Number: H 929.1 F536
2010
Fisher draws from her own experiences to help beginning genealogists before they begin their research. She explains the research and organization process, including how to organize material and collect data; where to find and write for information, including census records, church records, cemeteries, obituaries, land records, and researching away from home; and how to document findings and keep track of expenses.
Highlander by University High School Highlander  
Call Number: H 371.8976 H638
University High School yearbooks for 1962, 1963, and 1964.
The Fall and Recapture of Detroit in the War of 1812: In Defense of William Hull  by Anthony  YanikThe Fall and Recapture of Detroit in the War of 1812: In Defense of William Hull  
Yanik, Anthony
Call Number: H 973.52 Y23
Brigadier General William Hull was sentenced to death for his surrender at Detroit two months after the declaration of the War of 1812. This book takes a fresh look at the surrender and Hull's stated reasons for it. It explores the causes of the War of 1812 and describes the settlement of Detroit on the eve of the war, then recounts Hull's career, the trek to Detroit, the ill-fated invasion of Canada, and the surrender and its consequences for Detroit.
Elly Peterson: Elly Peterson: "Mother" of the Moderates  
Fitzgerald, Sara
Call Number: H 921 P4838F
2011
Elly Peterson was one of the highest ranking women in the Republican Party. In 1964 she ran for a Michigan seat in the U.S. Senate and became the first woman to serve as chair of the Michigan Republican Party. During the 1960s she grew disenchanted with the increasing conservatism of her party, united with other feminists to push for the Equal Rights Amendment and reproductive choice, battled Phyllis Schlafly to prevent her from gaining control of the National Federation of Republican Women, and became an independent.Elly Peterson's story is a missing chapter in the political history of Michigan, as well as the United States. This new biography, written by Sara Fitzgerald (a Michigan native and former Washington Post editor), finally gives full credit to one of the first female political leaders in this country.
Rochester and Rochester Hills  by Meredith  LongRochester and Rochester Hills  
Long, Meredith
2011
Rochester and Rochester Hills grew in a territory of three rivers, abundantly fertile pastures, and rolling oak forests on land once considered uninhabitable. Though only 30 miles from Detroit, official government reports of swampy and barren land deterred settlers. In 1817, the Graham family disregarded these reports, instead following the advice of Native Americans to reach a territory governed by a triumvirate of creeks, which were forceful enough to power several mills yet gentle enough to support thriving farms. Only 20 years later, every plot in Rochester had been sold. Later the village was made a stop on the network of Michigan railroads, cementing its fate as a vigorous and popular community. With a past boasting such illustrious citizens as auto baron John Dodge and internationally prominent obstetrician Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen, with corporations like Parke-Davis and philanthropic organizations such as Leader Dogs for the Blind, Rochester remains a source of innovative leadership as well as a model for successful suburbia.
True crime: Michigan: The State's Most Notorious Criminal Cases  by Tobin  BuhkTrue crime: Michigan: The State's Most Notorious Criminal Cases  
Buhk, Tobin
Call Number: H 364.1 B9315
Includes...* Andrew Kehoe and the Bath School Massacre* The rise and fall of the Purple Gang in Detroit* The Michigan victims of lonely hearts killers Beck and Fernandez* Jimmy Hoffa's disappearance* The criminal career of Coral Watts
Once Upon a Car: The Fall and Resurrection of America's Big Three Auto Makers--GM, Ford, and Chrysler  by Bill VlasicOnce Upon a Car: The Fall and Resurrection of America's Big Three Auto Makers--GM, Ford, and Chrysler  
Vlasic, Bill
Call Number: H 338.476292 V867
2011
The Detroit bureau chief for "The New York Times" takes readers inside the Big Three U.S. automakers for the rise and fall--and rise again?--of this quintessentially American industry.
Hearts Beating for Liberty: Women Abolitionists in the Old Northwest  by Stacey RobertsonHearts Beating for Liberty: Women Abolitionists in the Old Northwest  
Robertson, Stacey
Call Number: H 326.8 R652
2010
Challenging traditional histories of abolition, this book shifts the focus away from the East to show how the women of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin helped build a vibrant antislavery movement in the Old Northwest. 
A Little More Freedom: African Americans Enter the Urban Midwest, 1860-1930  by Jack  BlockerA Little More Freedom: African Americans Enter the Urban Midwest, 1860-1930  
Blocker, Jack
2008
Why did African Americans move from the rural South to the metropolitan North? Scholars have shown that African Americans took part in the urbanization of American society between the Civil War and the Great Depression, but the racial dimensions of their migration have remained unclear. A Little More Freedom is the first study to trace African American locational choices during the crucial period when migrants created pathways that would shape mobility through the twentieth century and beyond.
Vintage Views Along the West Michigan Pike: From Sand Trails to US-31  by Christine ByronVintage Views Along the West Michigan Pike: From Sand Trails to US-31  
Byron, Christine
Call Number: H 977.4 B996
2011
The historic West Michigan Pike, originally M-11, was the first continuous, improved road between Michigan City and Mackinaw City. This route along the Lake Michigan coast opened West Michigan to automobile travel and tourism. The book depicts the adventure and romance of motoring on Michigan's most prominent early highway. Vintage postcards, photographs, maps, and ephemera illustrate this journey as you time-travel through the beautiful West Michigan landscape and quaint towns to hotels and cabins, tourist camps and state parks, and other stops along the road.
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