Staff Picks: Movies

Staff-recommended viewing from the KPL catalog.

Guilty Until Proven Innocent

Last year, the Danish film The Hunt was nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Foreign Language Film category. It's the story of the social and individual price of a child's lie. Good natured Lucas works at the local elementary school, beloved by the school children and adored by his hunting buddies, Lucas finds himself at the center of a police probe after his best friend's daughter claims that Lucas abused her. As the town rallies behind the girl's claim, Lucas finds himself socially disconnected from the small town and the target of violence. The film tackles the subject of mob mentality and how quickly a faleshood can function to demonize an innocent person. Driven by a strong performance by the lead actor, The Hunt is an excellent film worth checking out.

Movie

The Hunt
11024892
RyanG

Goosebumps One Day at Horrorland and Welcome to Camp Nightmare

Goosebumps is a series of stories by R.L. Stine designed to give you Goose Bumps, to make you get a tiny bit frightened. These stories are geared towards children, I’d say between ages 6 and 12 but it depends on the child. In Goosebumps One Day at HorrorLand a family is on vacation and comes across an amusement park called HorrorLand. They stop and go in. The two children go to the house of mirrors and the girl feels like the walls are caving in and she is going to be crushed when the floor falls out and she is expelled. The boy pops out shortly after and thinks it was a blast. Later we find that the monsters are real and the humans are on a monster reality show. The costumes are very non real looking so as an adult you are nonplussed but for a little kid it can be scary.

This DVD has two movies, the second is titled Welcome to Camp Nightmare. I found this one more to my liking. A bus takes a group of children out into the woods for a campout. Things start happening, like a snake bites one of the campers. To me this was horrifying. They used what looks like a real snake and I have a phobia for snakes. I quickly fast forwarded. Later in the movie they complement Billy on how he trapped the snake. You can’t prove that by me but I’m not checking on it either. The camper who was bitten dies and weirdly the camp consolers tell Billy that camper was never here. Other strange things happen, two campers drown in the lake and a werewolf is prowling the woods. All culminating in the ending which I will not reveal here. Except for the snake this was a pretty good short 45 min movie.

Movie

 

Goosebumps One Day at Horrorland and Welcome to Camp Nightmare


10231202
Gary

Carried Away

Carried Away is a story about a family and their relationships with each other. It starts with Ed Franklin coming home from Hollywood to Fort Worth Texas. I don’t think we know why. We see that he is a bit of a loser. When he is waiting for his mother to pick him up from the airport we hear him on the phone telling someone about his new play where he is playing all the parts. Just listening to him describe the play you know it will be a boring disaster. We find out the person he is talking to is his ex girlfriend and they have been broken up for months. Then we meet the family, the mother who is not happy with her husband, the younger brother who is awaiting trial for selling pot and seems to be nice and caring, the other brother, who is built like an ox and reverts to physical actions when trying to make his point. Then there is the Father who is a dominating patriarch, a that’s it end of discussion you will do it my way kind of guy.

We find that the grandmother is in a nursing home and she is not happy there. Ed had taken care of and lived with his grandmother from when he was age 8 to age 17. Ed decides to take his grandmother out of the nursing home and take her to live with him in Hollywood. He loads her up in the car and off they go. The father finds out and is furious, the two sons get in the car with him and they take off on a road trip to set things right. What follows is humorous and touching. This isn’t a block buster type of movie but I enjoyed it. Give it a try.

Movie

Carried Away
10714508
Gary

Revenge Is a Dish Best Served Blue

I knew very little about Blue Ruin when I went to see it at Kalamazoo’s Alamo Drafthouse theater—just that it was a revenge thriller that had been widely beloved by critics. It was one of the “Drafthouse Recommends” featured titles, which—for movie buffs like me—is a stamp of approval worth heeding. And wouldn’t you know it: this edge-of-your-seat thriller has turned out to be the best thing I’ve seen so far this year. I appreciated not knowing even the basic premise of the film going into it—a rarity in this age of oversharing, spoiler-y trailers—so I will tell you very little about it in hopes that you will be pleasantly surprised as well.

Here’s what I’ll share: As I’ve said, it’s a revenge thriller, so you know somebody wants to get back at somebody else, but it will take that premise in surprising directions; it’s bloody, so you’ll need to be able to stomach some gore; and perhaps most importantly, you’ll get to see Eve Plumb, best known for playing Jan on The Brady Bunch in her youth, wielding a machine gun (who doesn’t want to see that?).  So check it out: Blue Ruin, available soon on DVD here at KPL, and keep an eye out for more “Drafthouse Recommends” titles. The Alamo brings a lot of great films to Kalamazoo that no other theater does. As a die-hard movie fan, I rarely go anywhere else.

Movie

Blue Ruin
11073586
http://kzpl.ent.sirsi.net/client/KPL/search/results?qu=Blue+Ruin&qf=FORMAT%09Format%09VIDEODISC%09Video+disc&te=ILS&lm=ALLLIBS&rt=false%7C%7C%7CTITLE%7C%7C%7CTitle
DanHoag

The Title Says It All

Under the Skin is a new film that will figuratively get under your skin with its nightmarishly surreal images and discomfiting plot. Simply put, it’s a slow-burning, almost dialogue free collection of bizarre images that possess a creepiness that leaves its evocative residue all over your mind well after the credits have rolled by. The film is careful to make sure that the weirdness is couched in ideas, specifically notions about perception and how we look at one another often from unfamiliar perspectives. Ultimately, the film feels as though it should have been fleshed out into something on an expanded scale with a more substantive engagement with its ideas. A perfect film, no. A must-see film, absolutely.

Movie

Under the Skin
11089480
RyanG

Persona

Throughout the history of cinema, many filmmakers have attempted to examine the nature of identity and the notion of the ‘self’ but few have made a film as visually rich and haunting as director Ingmar Bergman’s masterful Persona—a tour de force of a movie that when released in 1966 expanded the poetry of film and solidified Bergman as one of the great artists of the medium. For some critics, the film has been viewed as a hypnotic culmination of many of his themes and obsessions. For others, Persona was a confusing, unintelligible and pretentious mess. Time has been very friendly to this influential precursor to films like Mulholland Drive, 3 Women, Black Swan, Fight Club and other psychodramas that portray identity and self as an unfixed, transferable construct that modulates between states of being rather than as a permanent characteristic of the human psyche. This classic  is now on Blu-ray as well as DVD.

Movie

Persona
11049059
RyanG

The Unknown Known

Fans of Errol Morris documentaries will not be surprised by his approach to understanding his most recent subject, the life and philosophies of Donald Rumsfeld. There are the standard cutaways to spirited music (Danny Elfman’s score) blended into a particular image or graphic that relates in some way to the film’s subject. There is the occasional moment where the viewer hears Morris pose a question or request additional information from off camera. Basically, this is a very typical Errol Morris film. Like his previous film The Fog of War, where he allowed former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara to candidly speak about his role in the escalation and continuation of the Vietnam War, Morris lets Rumsfeld freely talk to the audience, only interjecting here and there in order to pose a question or contradict his subject’s commentary, much of which exhibits Rumsfeld’s talent for turning a phrase (always with a gleam in his eye and a smirk). Morris is clearly fascinated by Rumsfeld’s hubris, confidence, sense of moral clarity, and ability to be dualistically self-aware and ludicrously delusional-- at times he embodies both within a single exchange of ideas. Those who blame Rumsfeld for the invasion and occupation of Iraq will likely be frustrated that Morris refuses to take a more confrontational stance toward some of Rumsfeld’s claims. This has always been Morris’ artistic approach however, to engage his subject by allowing them to feel comfortable enough to be frank and thus more honest, a successful method that allows the viewer critical insights into the mind of Rumsfeld that otherwise would be lost within a polemical or satiric slant. Ultimately, Rumsfeld doesn't blink, doesn't self-evaluate, and therefore, one mostly sees in his glib snark, a man who sticks to his schtick.

Movie

The Unknown Known
11073584
RyanG

Not Just a Sports Movie

As with most of the wonderful films that have been made under the ESPN film series 30 for 30, Youngstown Boys is a moving examination of the relationship between power, money, urban neglect and the role that larger socioeconomic forces play in molding the lives of individual athletes as they develop both on and off the proverbial field. These are not films about sports as such but rather powerful documentaries that explore the lives of the famous and infamous through a sociological lens, positioning their subjects within a broad framework for understanding the causes and effects of noteworthy events. This is the story of the rise and fall and rise again journey of a successful college football coach and his star player. It’s also a story all too common in today’s world, where young, inner-city athletes are confronted with difficult challenges and choices in regards to their future. Running back Maurice Claret and coach Jim Tressel were the toast of Columbus, Ohio for one magical year of success before controversy erupted on Ohio State's campus, leaving both men in very different situations, both trying to succeed in a world of greed, influence and big money. Claret’s story unfolded under the intense glare of the national media whereas the documentary provides greater clarity and a more nuanced context as to the events that would test the strong bond between these two Youngstown Boys.

Movie

Youngstown Boys
11054259

 

RyanG

Enemy: Style Over Substance

Last year, the psychological thriller Prisoners was a break out hit for Canadian director Denis Villeneuve. With his follow-up film Enemy, once again starring Jake Gyllenhaal, the director embraces Hitchcockian style and atmosphere over formal plotting. Enemy is a kind of tone poem of dread and anxiety that I suspect will leave many a viewer grumpy and unsatisfied (more description would only spoil it). I for one enjoyed Villeneuve’s playful antics and commitment to the project over any kind responsibility to provide viewers with a conventional follow up. Fans will either love the Kafkaesque horror of the film or despise it for its provocative resistance to philistinism.  You decide.


Movie

Enemy
11072045

 

RyanG

A Network Show Worth Watching

The Good Wife is one of the best network television shows and after five seasons, still going strong with its mixture of secrecy, passion, scheming and legal maneuvering.

It possesses all of the elements for a successful serial: power politics, courtroom confrontations drawn from the headlines, mysterious characters, well-paced intrigue, and nuanced storytelling. Throw in a fantastic cast (that’s refreshingly racially diverse) that brings to life the smart writing and you have a hit show worth binging on.

 

Movie

The Good Wife

10441241
RyanG