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Staff Picks: Movies

Election Season

With another presidential election cycle upon us, I noticed the documentary Please Vote For Me on display in the lower level.  The office open is class monitor for a 3rd grade class in a school in Wuhan, China, having its first democratic election.  

As they navigate the challenge of giving speeches, sharing a talent, participating in debates, and other activities to win votes; there are plenty of laughs, a lot of tears and occasionally some shouting.    

I found the interactions with the parents to be the most fascinating parts as they often gave advice that I was not expecting.  Also, when their children were ridiculed or treated poorly, they usually coached them on being tougher and shrugging it off, rather than going to the school to ask them to not allow such behavior.  

Who will win?  Cheng Cheng with charisma to spare, strict Luo Lei with powerful parents, or Xu Xiaofei the courageous underdog candidate.  

I watched this with my 10 year old daughter and 12 year old son and they really enjoyed it and it led to some good conversation about election tactics and cultural differences.  

Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

This amazing PBS documentary won more than 25 awards; I’m not surprised. Bayard Rustin was a strong civil rights organizer, peace activist, openly gay man. He lived with pride, refusing to kowtow to those who said he should hide his sexual orientation on behalf of his antiracism organizing. The principles for which he stood are as vital today as they were during his lifetime.

The movie shows several clips of Rustin addressing a crowd. He was powerful and persuasive, whether speaking to Congress, other organizers or young people. I especially enjoyed a scene where Rustin was visiting children overseas. He interacted with them in a joyful, respectful way, teaching them to sing a song. Though they didn’t speak his language and he didn’t speak theirs, they connected, and the kids responded to his kindness and enthusiasm.

The film includes interviews with many people who knew Rustin personally and/or professionally. One of his colleagues on the organizing committee of the famous 1963 March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom, current Congresswoman Eleanore Holmes Norton, talked about how politicians and the news media discouraged the organizers from trying to create the march. Yet they didn’t realize that it just couldn’t fail, with an organizer like Bayard Rustin behind it. “They didn’t know what I knew, and that was that the best organizer on the planet was organizing this one!”

In August, 1963, Ms. Norton volunteered to stay in the March on Washington office till the eleventh hour, answering last-minute phone calls, which meant she had to fly on a plane to the March. “… And If I live to be 500, I will never forget what I saw….” The film then cut to a birds-eye view of the National Mall from above, completely filled with thousands of people marching peacefully.

There are many moving scenes in this film about Bayard Rustin and his influence on social justice across the years. I wrote this above, and I’ll write it again: The principles for which he stood are as vital today as they were during his lifetime.

The Best 10 Films I've Seen Lately

March was a decent month for film viewing as I've finally gotten around to seeing some high quality documentaries like The Pleasures of Being Out of Step. Here are some other highlights for your consideration.

10. Fox Catcher

9. Top Five

8. Force Majeure

7. Boy Meets Girl

6. The Overnighters

5. Life Itself

4. Days of Being Wild

3. The Internet's Own Boy

2. The Soft Skin

1. A Summer's Tale (Eric Rohmer may not be as well known as his French New Wave compatriots Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut but this late film (1996), finally released in the United States, proved his knack for chatty characters on scenic locales could still elicit charming insights about youthful romance and relationships thirty years after his peak.  


Women's History Month Highlights

March is Women’s History Month and so in keeping with the theme of highlighting the achievements and contributions of women involved with movie-making, here’s a list of writers, directors and some of their groundbreaking works.

Ava DuVernay (I Will Follow, Middle of Nowhere, Selma)
Agnes Varda (Cleo from 5 to 7, Vagabond)
Kathryn Bigelow (The Hurt Locker, Zero Dark Thirty)
Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture)
Maya Deren (Maya Deren: Experimental Films)
Penny Marshall (A League of Their Own)
Allison Anders (Border Radio)
Claire Denis (White Material, Bastards)
Chantal Akerman (From the Other Side, Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles)
Lynne Ramsay (Ratcatcher)
Ida Lupino (The Hitchhiker)
Elaine May (The Birdcage, A New Leaf)

Listening is an Act of Love

You may remember when the StoryCorps mobile booth came to town, and several local people recorded interviews with a significant person in their lives. Maybe you even recorded an interview with a loved one.

KPL has many StoryCorps interviews, preserved electronically--where you can hear the original speakers--or transcribed into book format. Now you can listen and watch, for the latest StoryCorps acquisition is the animated DVD, Listening is an Act of Love: a StoryCorps Special. This project is chock full of moving interviews and fabulous animation. You won’t want it to end!

The holidays are a great time to gather family members around, watch, listen or even read interviews aloud to each other. Check out some StoryCorps interviews today!


Health & Fitness

Whether you're looking for a way to manage stress during the busy holiday season or get an early start on your New Year's resolution, the library offers access to a variety of fitness videos through our streaming service, Hoopla. You can find everything from dance to pilates and yoga. There's an assortment of workouts from Jillian Michaels, as well as a multi-workout series from Harley Pasternak. If you want a throwback workout, you can sweat to the oldies with Richard Simmons.

If you'd rather checkout a DVD, we have a range of options at our KPL locations. Search the catalog for yoga, pilates, aerobic dancing, exercise, physical fitness, muscle strength, or aerobic exercises.

The Beauty of Everyday Life

Before falling into obscurity, the slice of life documentary Cousin Jules was well-received by critics in the early 1970's. Restored and released again, this wonderful film takes viewers into a world that to contemporary eyes appears primitive and exotic in view of our high-speed, high- tech, consumer society. Back in the 1960’s, those who lived off of the land in provincial France led slow, ordinary lives connected to the earth and to long-established practices. They made their own tools, harvested their own food and wine, ground their own coffee without electricity, accessed water from a well, and in general, lived off the land with a kind of raw independence and austerity that is almost unheard of in today’s postmodern society, one defined by ease, speed and consumerism. The film features Jules, a blacksmith who is short on conversation but whose mundane tasks are mesmerizing as they are without pretense or excess. The viewer is taken inside the routine rituals of everyday life, slowly, tenderly and without artifice or without a structured plot and yet the film feels fresh, a kind of poetic meditation on the nobility of craftsmanship and the humdrum ways of life that have been largely automated.

70 Years Ago

70 years ago today, one of World War II's most significant battles was D-Day, the day in which thousands of Allied soldiers crossed the English Channel to invade German occupied France. There's certainly no shortage of informational resources on this topic but if you're a WWII buff or simply want to know more about this imporant day in the fight against Nazi Germany, check out The War by Americana documentarian Ken Burns. This is my favorite work of Burns and his most emotionally dramatic. Soldiers who were there, storming the beaches of Normandy, recount with unfiltered descriptions, the horrors, heroism, and blunders that they experienced on that fateful day and in doing so, provide an unromanticized version of their sacrifice. It's Burn's most stirring documentary and one that is required viewing for those interested in World War II. For those who want their history fictionalized, KPL owns many feature films set during wartime, including Saving Private Ryan, Life Is Beautiful, Schindler's List, The Big Red One, Force 10 from Navarone, The Thin Red Line, The English Patient, The Winds of War, In Darkness, Ivan's Childhood, The Cranes are Flying, and Flags of Our Fathers.


The War

Chisholm & Davis: Activists and Leaders

Shola Lynch, a documentary filmmaker who has garnered much critical acclaim for her incisive and salient films, is one director whose films are invaluable, particularly for people like me who didn't live through the turbulent times they speak of. Lynch is interested in participatory democracy and how people, especially people who have been historically denied a voice (and a vote), forge new ways and means of being heard. As the director of Chisholm ’72 and Free Angela and All Political Prisoners, Lynch shares with audiences the stories of the titular African American women, both activists and leaders in political and social justice movements in the late 1960s to 70s.

Chisholm ’72: Unbought and Unbossed

Shirley Chisholm was our nation’s first Black congresswoman, and her gutsy run for president several years later was another first in U.S. History; she was working under the belief that people would vote with their conscience, rather than cynically voting for “the man most likely…” Lynch portrays the complicated political forces involved that make for a gripping story.

Free Angela and All Political Prisoners

Dr. Angela Davis sought social justice, not by running for elected office (that would transpire years later) but initially by teaching and working directly with local activists. The events that transpire thereafter are so incredible and outrageous that I cannot retell them with any justice here - Lynch has already done that.



Chisholm ’72: Unbought and Unbossed

Beer! Michigan Beer!

It’s no secret that the craft beer movement is burgeoning in Michigan—with Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo taking first and second place respectively in the annual Beer City USA poll last year, it’s clear that Michiganders love their craft brews. If you’re interested in finding out more about craft brewing in Michigan, check out The Michigan Beer Film. It focuses mainly on Southwest Michigan, following Greenbush Brewing Company as it rapidly expands and crediting Bell’s for founding the craft beer scene in Michigan. It takes a brief tour of the U.P. and a stop at Short’s Brewing Company, along with a look at a brewing upstart in Detroit. I would have liked to have seen a bit more of brewing around the state, but it is nice to see what’s going on in our area of Michigan, and it’s particularly good to see an industry that’s growing in Michigan. So grab an Oberon and watch The Michigan Beer Film!




Michigan Beer Movie