Staff Picks: Music

Liked That, Try This No. 2

Looking for artists similar to those you already know about and enjoy? Well, we’ll try to make suggestions that expand your musical listening experience. Don't forget, you can access music from KPL through compact discs, free MP3 downloads (Freegal) and internet streamed albums via Hoopla.  

• Liked Beach House, try Wye Oak
• Liked Steve Earle, try David Allan Cole
• Liked Pavement, try Parquet Courts
• Liked Solange, try Kelis
• Liked Bruno Mars, try Fitz and the Tantrums
• Liked early Pink Floyd, try Tame Impala
• Liked Lorde, try Sharon Van Etten

Music

Shriek
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RyanG

Unrepentant Geraldines

“I can remember where I come from.”

That line is from a 1992 Tori Amos song entitled “Mother,” a beautiful piano ballad about leaving home, or maybe leaving what you know. It’s really more of a plea than an assertion—a fear about forgetting what makes us who we are. The song, one of my personal favorites, is off her first album, Little Earthquakes, and now—22 years and 13 albums later—Tori brings that idea full circle with her latest LP, Unrepentant Geraldines. In the song “Oysters,” she sings, “I’m working my way back to me again.” Exploring the self or being self-aware is a common thread throughout all of her albums, but it resonates particularly strongly with Geraldines, in part because the album seems to be a return to form for her—that is, it’s more piano-based, simple storytelling/songwriting than some of her recent high-concept albums. I could easily hear a song like “Weatherman” nestled between the songs on 1994’s Under the Pink or “Selkie” sitting alongside the best of her early B-sides. Don’t get me wrong—this isn’t Tori trying to relive past glories; the songs are much fresher than if she were trying to replicate what she’s already done. Unrepentant Geraldines comes from a different place than any of her early work, from a maturity that only comes with time—whether that means writing about aging (“16 Shades of Blue”), being a mother (“Rose Dover” and “Promise”), or corporate greed/religious oppression (“Unrepentant Geraldines”). Her early work will always be my favorite, but I’m happy to have an album like Geraldines that, over 20 years after I first started listening to her, speaks to me.

If you’ve liked any of her previous work, I’d give this album a try. In addition to the CDs we have in our collection, you can find almost every Tori Amos album, including Unrepentant Geraldines, on Hoopla. What isn’t on Hoopla—Scarlet’s Walk, The Beekeeper, and American Doll Posse—is available on Freegal.

 

Music

Unrepentant Geraldines
11061569

 

CaitlinH

Some Autumn for Your Summer Listening

Fans of the band Wilco may already be aware of Chicago’s The Autumn Defense given two of its members are Wilco’s bassist (John Stirratt) and keyboardist (Pat Sansone). But those who love laid back, radio-friendly songwriting that echoes the early and mid-1970’s work of tunesmiths like Bread, Emitt Rhodes, Big Star, ELO, The Carpenters should check them out. Their newest album, Fifth came out this week and it’s full of sweetly polished folk-pop that’s perfect for a summer breeze.

Music

Fifth
11053483
RyanG

Nikki Lane: Now on Hoopla

If you dig the music of The Black Keys, Caitlin Rose, The Ronettes, Wanda Jackson, and She and Him, head on over to our free streaming service called Hoopla and borrow the newest album from Nikki Lane, a new singer from Nashville whose songs strike a nice balance between vintage country and girl group pop. Produced by Dan Auerbach (guitarist from The Black Keys) All or Nothin’ will be here in compact disc format soon but if you can’t wait, stream it from Hoopla now for free.

Music

All or Nothin'
11071458
RyanG