Mexico

Randy Lopez Goes Home: a novel by Rudolfo AnayaRandy Lopez Goes Home: a novel
Anaya, Rudolfo
2011
When he was a young man, Randy Lopez left his village in northern New Mexico to seek his fortune. Since then, he has learned some of the secrets of success in the Anglo world-and even written a book calledLife Among the Gringos. But something has been missing. Now he returns to Agua Bendita to reconnect with his past and to find the wisdom the Anglo world has not provided. In this allegorical account of Randy's final journey, master storyteller Rudolfo Anaya tackles life's big questions with a light touch.Randy's entry into the haunted canyon that leads to his ancestral home begins on the Day of the Dead. Reuniting with hispadrinos-his godparents-and hoping to meet up with his lost love, Sofia, Randy encounters a series of spirits: coyotes, cowboys, Death, and the devil. Each one engages him in a conversation about life. It is Randy's old teacher Miss Libriana who suggests his new purpose. She gives him a book,How to Build a Bridge.Only the bridge-which is both literal and figurative, like everything else in this story-can enable Randy to complete his journey.Readers acquainted with Anaya's fiction will find themselves in familiar territory here. Randy Lopez, like all Anaya's protagonists, is on a spiritual quest. But both those new to and familiar with Anaya will recognize this philosophical meditation as part of a long literary tradition going back to Homer, Dante, and the Bible. Richly allusive and uniquely witty,Randy Lopez Goes Homepresents man's quest for meaning in a touching, thought-provoking narrative that will resound with young adults and mature readers alike.Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Like Water for Chocolate: A novel in monthly installments, with recipes, romances, and home remedies by Laura EsquivelLike Water for Chocolate: A novel in monthly installments, with recipes, romances, and home remedies
Esquivel, Laura
1992
Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico became a best-selling phenomenon with its winning blend of poignant romance and bittersweet wit. The classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother's womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef. She shares special points of her favorite preparations with listeners throughout the story.Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Irma Voth: a novel by Miriam ToewsIrma Voth: a novel
Toews, Miriam
2011
Toews's (A Complicated Kindness) story unfolds in a remote Mennonite outpost in Mexico, where the strictly observant cross paths with the narcos, creating an uncomfortable cultural mix of Spanish, English, and Low German. Nineteen-year-old Irma tells of her own alienation from the Mennonites after marrying a young Mexican man. Though she still lives near her family, her patriarchal father has ordered her shunned (her spirited little sister, however, continues to visit, half-angry, half-longing for brief contact). After a quick wedding, Irma's husband is rarely home, and Irma is lonely until an eccentric crew of filmmakers arrives to make a movie set among the Mennonites. Irma works as a translator and finds much in common with these artists and lost souls. But her father holds an overblown hatred of the filmmakers, believing them evil. When his menacing opposition begins to threaten the film-and her sister's safety-Irma, ennobled by her experience on the production, makes a radical choice that will greatly affect her family. With her fifth novel, Toews, who was born into a Mennonite community in Canada, combines an intimate coming-of-age tale with picaresque and extremely effective prose. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Mañana forever? : Mexico and the Mexicans by Jorge CastañedaMañana forever? : Mexico and the Mexicans
Castañeda, Jorge
Call Number: 972 C3466
2011
Why are Mexicans so successful in individual sports, but deficient in team play? Why do Mexicans dislike living in skyscrapers? Why do Mexicans love to see themselves as victims, but also love victims? And why, though the Mexican people traditionally avoid conflict, is there so much violence in a country where many leaders have died by assassination? In this shrewd and fascinating book, the renowned scholar and former foreign minister Jorge Casta eda sheds much light on the puzzling paradoxes of his native country. Here's a nation of 110 million that has an ambivalent and complicated relationship with the United States yet is host to more American expatriates than any country in the world. Its people tend to resent foreigners yet have made the nation a hugely popular tourist destination. Mexican individualism and individual ties to the land reflect a desire to conserve the past and slow the route to uncertain modernity. Casta eda examines the future possibilities for Mexico as it becomes more diverse in its regional identities, socially more homogenous, its character and culture the instruments of change rather than sources of stagnation, its political system more open and democratic. Manana Forever? is a compelling portrait of a nation at a crossroads.Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
Down and delirious in Mexico City : the Aztec metropolis in the twenty-first century by Daniel HernándezDown and delirious in Mexico City : the Aztec metropolis in the twenty-first century
Hernández, Daniel
Call Number: 972.53 H5573
2011
A young journalist's vibrant account of contemporary Mexico City, focusing on the city's distinctive "tribes" of urban youth.Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
The Mexicans : a personal portrait of a people  by Patrick OsterThe Mexicans : a personal portrait of a people
Oster, Patrick
Call Number: 972.08 O85
1989
To correct Americans' lack of understanding of Mexico, Oster combines human interest stories, many collected during his years as a Knight-Ridder reporter in Mexico, with carefully interwoven information on and analysis of political, economic, and social issues. The subjects of his short biographies are a cross-section of Mexicans: men, women, gays, politicians, intellectuals, business people, farmers, expatriates, and many more. He gives the general reader, to whom this book is addressed, a realistic and captivating view of Mexico, better than any now available. Although there are scattered errors of fact, they do not detract from the importance and readability of the book.-- Donald J. Mabry, Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. Enriched Content Provided by Syndetics
The labyrinth of solitude ; The other Mexico ; Return to the labyrinth of solitude ; Mexico and the United States ; The philanthropic ogre by Octavio PazThe labyrinth of solitude ; The other Mexico ; Return to the labyrinth of solitude ; Mexico and the United States ; The philanthropic ogre
Paz, Octavio
Call Number: 972.08 P348.2
1985