Reviews by Teens in Galley Group

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Flash Burnout  by L. K. Madigan

Reviewed by I. L., age 13

"It is about a teenager who discovers himself."

Geektastic by Holly Black and Cecil Castellucci

Reviewed by R. K., age 17

"I enjoyed the fact that the overall theme of being a 'geek" was done in a mostly light-hearted manner and that in each author's bio were listed the things that make the authors themselves 'geeky.'  Being a true geek myself, it made it easier for me to connect to both the stories and to those who wrote them." 

Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick

Reviewed by S. A., age 14

"Nora Gray falls for a guy who is really bad for her.  But he attracts her to him and she just can't stay away."

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher

Reviewed by W. P., age 17

"Trapped in a living prison, a boy must rely on help from the outside to escape.  The plot twists that create the characters and advance them through their obstacles will leave you wondering what happens next."

King of the Screwups by K. L. Going

Reviewed by T. M., age 14

"Once kicked out of his house, Liam must decide who to be.  Does he want his father's pride or his mother's approval?  living with his gay uncle somehow brings out the best in Liam as he makes his choice." 

"You know a book is good when you start to hate a fictional character.'"

Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen

Reviewed by S. M., age 16

"The most compelling aspect of this book was the way it can connect with so many teens who've felt they had to grow up too quickly or have been through divorce."

War Child by Emmaunel Jal

Reviewed by A. H., age 13

"Emmanuel Jal was just an ordinary child in Sudan.  But when civil war reaches his doorstep, he is coerced into the "glorious" army.  After Jal is rescued by a British social worker, he tries to put his life together, but no matter how he struggles, he is shunned and different, until he starts experimenting with music."

Peace, Love & Baby Ducks by Lauren Myracle

Reviewed by G. G., age 12

"It is now my favorite book, even on top of Twilight.  I like how teens can relate to this book because of all the stress of growing up."

The Rule of Claw by John Brindley

Reviewed by R. K., age 17

"The characters of the books seemed to be flesh and blood rather than paper.  The main character, Ash, is a simple person, but the reader truly connects with her struggle to find herself and her place in the world.  I felt her pain, wondered with her as to why everything was happening, and reveled in her joy."

Tales of the Madman Underground by John Barnes

Reviewed by J. F., age 16

"I think a lot of teenagers will identify with the way this author writes; very down to earth and amusing, funny while still touching on the more difficults aspects of life."