Winner! 2011 State History Award

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From the 23 September 2011 HSM press release:

TRAVERSE CITY—The Historical Society of Michigan presented its 2011 State History Awards at the 137th Annual Meeting and State History Conference held September 23-25 in Traverse City. The awards were presented at the annual awards reception and banquet Friday evening. The State History Awards are the highest recognition presented by the state’s official historical society.

Each year the Historical Society of Michigan presents a State History Award to those individuals and organizations that have made outstanding contributions to the appreciation and understanding of Michigan history. Criteria: Excellence of achievement by an individual or organization in the collection, preservation and promotion of state and local history.

Seventeen awards were presented this year in a variety of categories, including Lifetime Achievement, Distinguished Volunteer Service, Outstanding Educator, Communications, Local Societies, Institutions, Restoration/Preservation, Media, Publications: University and Commercial Press, Publications: Private Printing, Educational Programs, and Special Programs and Events.

In the Communications: Newsletters and Websites category, the award was presented to the Kalamazoo Public Library for its website All About Kalamazoo History. The library’s Local History Department took the lead in web-based historical information several years ago by launching an online index of the Kalamazoo Gazette. It was the first in the area to feature hundreds of local photographs online from three cultural institutions. All About Kalamazoo goes beyond this. It now includes nearly 600 interconnected web pages and covers more than 20 categories. The pages include information about people and places from Kalamazoo’s past, researched and written by members of the Kalamazoo Public Library staff. Categories include biographies, cemeteries, rural schools, houses/buildings, businesses, educational, and cultural institutions. The pages provide basic and sometimes very detailed information about these topics. They also include citations, allowing researchers to delve further into the topics or verify the information. Many of the pages include illustrations or historical photos. This website is an invaluable resource for researchers ranging from middle school students competing in History Day to genealogists. — The Historical Society of Michigan